Share Your Passion for Literature

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Do the grey clouds hanging overhead portend a storm?

Will the onset of October herald a cool, cold rain? Hardly. October’s grey doldrums are kindled by the cardinal reds, yellows, and oranges of graduate opportunities tumbling from the trees.

Working in The Schools

Writers and students interested in aiding those in our community should pursue the Working in The Schools (WITS) mentoring opportunity. English faculty, staff, and students mentor fourth through sixth grade students from a Chicago Public School that is at least 90% low-income. Mentors do not have to leave campus to help students. WITS will bus the students to Arts & Letters Hall each Thursday, beginning October 10th, from 3:30-4:30, in Arts & Letters #412.

Two mentors usually work with a single student. During the mentoring hour you will take turns reading to one another and then spend the remaining time working on the student’s homework.

Training Session: Thursday, October 3rd, 3:30-4:30, Arts & Letters Hall #412, Tovah Burstein from WITS will lead a training for all potential English Dept. volunteers. She will help us understand the mentoring process. This training will also be an opportunity for you to be paired with another volunteer.

Fugue Opens Submissions

Fugue Literary Journal, a magazine run by English and Creative Writing graduate students at the University of Idaho, Moscow has opened for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry submissions. The Journal just celebrated its 25th anniversary last year, and looks forward to publishing quality writing from new and established writers.

General Submissions

Submissions are accepted online only. Poetry, Fiction and Nonfiction submissions are accepted September 1 through April 1. All material received outside of this period will neither be read nor considered for publication. General submissions must be submitted along with a required submission fee of $2.00 per submission. Multiple submissions will be considered with a separate submission fee for each. All contributors to Fugue receive payment, via check, for their work and two complimentary copies of the journal in which their work appears.

Fugue requests that  contributors send no more than six poems, two short-shorts, one story, or one essay per submission.

Submissions in more than one genre should be submitted separately and require separate submission fees. Fugue will consider simultaneous submissions (submissions sent concurrently to another journal or journals) as long as you notify them immediately if a piece you submitted simultaneously has been accepted elsewhere.

To submit either a General or Contest submission, please click here. FUGUESubmissionsOpen

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A Three Course Meal of News, Literature, and Events

Dishes served at The Signature Room on the 95th floor of the Hancock Building are renowned for their exquisite flavor. Each dish, a balanced masterpiece, is served above the city and placed on the white tablecloths many pedestrians will never see. It’s the combination of different flavors, not to mention the ambiance, that gives each dish its particular character. Every note is accented, recognized as being an important part of the meal, the whole. Today’s Ex Libris is a happy compendium of news from all over the department. Read on to discover writing announcements, new publications, and cocktail parties. The beginning of the quarter is a tantalizing time filled with different flavors demanding student and faculty attention. It’s the fusion of all these different happenings that makes the Department of English a dish that rivals any on the 95th.

Academic Reminders

Today, September 17th, is the last day to add fall classes. This is it, last day, no turning back.  Go forward into that young book and discover.

Next Tuesday, September 24th, is the last day to drop fall classes.  If students drop a class before the 24th, it is not included in their tuition and will never appear on their transcript.  If students drop a class after the 24th, they pay for the course and it appears on their transcript as a Withdrawal (W).

October 29th is the last day to withdraw from fall classes.  Any student still on the roster after October 29th must earn a letter grade.

Partial Tuition Scholarships

The M.A. in English and M.A. in Writing and Publishing programs are offering Partial Tuition Scholarships (PTS) to recognize outstanding academic achievement of students in the English department’s two graduate programs. Partial Tuition Scholarships provide a partial reimbursement for tuition paid for 2013 autumn graduate courses in English taken toward the MAE and MAWP degrees.

To learn more about the requirements for the PTS click here.

The deadline for applying for PTS awards for the 2013 Autumn Quarter is Monday, September 23. All requests for PTS awards must be made electronically, and they must be sent to Ms. Hickey via email. Copies of this memo and of the application can be found on the MAE and MAWP D2L sites under “Content.”

The Guild Complex Writing Contest

Prose Contest 2013 (digital final) (2)The Guild Literary Complex has opened submissions for their Annual Prose Awards.  Each fall, the Guild recognizes emerging and established writers.  Winners will be announced during a ceremony at the historic Chopin Theatre in Chicago. Judges include Cristina Henríquez and our very own Prof. Miles Harvey.

Writers of all backgrounds and experience levels are invited to submit, and all themes and subjects are welcome. Illinois residents 18 years old and older should submit a single piece of short fiction or non-fiction of no more than a 1,000 words typed, to contest@guildcomplex.org. There is a $5 submission fee payable via the pay pal donation button on this page. Submission fee also includes admission to the live event. All applications must be completed by 5 pm on October 1, 2013

Newberry Center of Renaissance Studies Call for Papers

The Newberry Center of Renaissance Studies is calling for graduate papers for their 2014 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference. The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for maturing scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies.

Chosen papers will be published in a peer edited online conference proceedings page. The 2014 conference has expanded to accommodate 72 different presenters.

Abstracts for 15-minute papers from master’s or PhD students from any discipline on any medieval, Renaissance, or early modern topic in Europe or the Mediterranean or Atlantic worlds must be submitted by midnight, Tuesday October 15th. Complete this submission form.

The early conference registration fee will be $30 for students from consortium member universities and their guests and $40 for those from other institutions. Late registration (after January 10) will be $45 and $55, respectively.

New Publications

Kathleen Rooney has published a collaborative chapbook with Elisa Gabbert entitled The Kind of Beauty That Has Nowhere to Go. The chapbook has been released by feminist publisher Hyacinth Girl. Learn more about the publication and even order a copy from Hyancinth’s website. To tempt you, here is a poem from the book.

SOME NOTES ON REMORSE

Beware of people whose motto is “No regrets.” They are violent innocents. Ravaged by love.

I want a point of view that isn’t mine to tell me that what I did wasn’t wrong. And permission to be sorry for the outcome, but not the event.

If you can’t feel remorse, you may be a sociopath. This isn’t all bad. If you feel called to live your life like a dirty free-for-all, you can.

They say it’s better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, but you make me wish I’d never been born.

Guilt is associated with the sound of bells tolling; remorse, the sound of wind through trees.

I would never say I’m sorry in a dream. However, I might set my most regrettable moments in the sky like a starry galaxy, and try to detect a pattern.

To show more remorse, lower your eyes. To show less, fix them up and ahead like an equestrian statue. In general, be blue-eyed and statuesque.

Don’t even try to tell me that swans mate for life. Do swans seem normal to you?

You may be sorry now, but you’ll be even sorrier if you get tear stains all over those satin sheets.

I was working my way up to an apology when a songbird lit upon my shoulder. Something in his tune made cruel jilting sound sweet. If my present self is the sum of my past actions, how can I be sorry?

Remorse smells like tallow soap and agony, but you can never wash it off. It does get fainter over time, like an exceptionally tenacious perfume.

To express remorse you must compose a detailed account of whatever offense you committed. Choose your font wisely; serifs are more emotive.

Thanks for the sympathy, but “buyer’s remorse” doesn’t really compare. Unless what you bought was from Satan.

We name our daughters by the traits we hope they’ll possess; she chose to name hers Rue.

The mental compartment where I store my remorse is the haunted garret in a mansion full of otherwise pleasant rooms.

Some people say there are five languages of apology.

I’m sorry you feel that way.

The EGSA Needs You

The English Graduate Student Association is celebrating the new school year with cocktails and beer at John Barleycorn on September 27th. Come revel in the great literary tradition of Dylan Thomas, Dos Passos, and Hemingway while meeting like minded graduate students looking to bring renewed passion to the EGSA. The event will kick off at 6:30 pm, and all are invited to attend.EGSADePaulFlyer1

A Call for Bronzeville and Lincoln Square Writers

Anthology of Chicago is a, “Literary project collecting poems and stories that evoke the spirit of Chicago’s many neighborhoods, celebrating those neighborhoods and the writers that live, work, and play in them.” Over the past year, the project has regularly posted pieces from Hyde Park, Pilsen, and Logan Square.

Anthology of Chicago wants you to use your neighborhood as a sandbox and springboard. They are looking for writers to map a creative topography of stories, art, and photographs for a community. The project’s board believes that these intimate stories will give insight into the uniquely Chicago character of certain neighborhoods.

Submissions are currently open for Bronzeville and Lincoln Square. Rachel Hyman, organizer of the project, is looking to collect submissions by September 30th.  You don’t have to live in the neighborhood to submit something, but the piece should accurately reflect the community it is meant to represent.

Submit your pieces for free using the site’s submission system.

They accept submissions of poems and short stories (loosely defined), with a heavy preference for creative works. No memoirs, please. Submit no more than 5 poems and stories of no more than 7 pages. Please put all poems together in a single file. Unpublished pieces are preferred, but exceptions may be made.

Submit to Bronzeville     Submit to Lincoln Square

Faculty News & Newcity’s Summer Guide

In Faculty News: Please join the English Department in congratulating Kathleen Rooney for being named 2013 winner of the Eric Hoffer Award for Poetry for her novel-in-poems Robinson Alone (Gold Wake Press, 2012).

A review in Booklist noted the following of Robinson Alone: “Rooney’s syncopated wordplay, supple musicality, and cinematic descriptions subtly embody… Robinson’s sardonic grace under pressure. An intricate, psychologically luminous homage, tale of American loneliness, and enthralling testament to poetry’s resonance.” Congrats, Prof. Rooney!

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Curbside Splendor Publishing is holding their second monthly Salon Splendor event tomorrow, Thursday, May 16th, at 7:30 p.m., and one of the evening’s featured readers is DePaul’s own Christine Sneed. The show will take place at Madame Zuzu’s, 582 Roger Williams Ave. in Highland Park.

The theme this month, Passages, will be taken on by authors Christine Sneed, Jac Jemc, and Scott Garson. The night will end with live music by house band Good Evening.

The series is confirmed through October, on the third Thursday of each month. Space is limited and reservations are strongly recommended. RSVP at sarah@madamezuzus.com.

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Next week, Newcity, Chicago’s free weekly alternative newspaper, is publishing their annual Summer Guide, and they’re looking for submissions. According to head editor Brian Hieggleke, “It’s one of the most free-wheeling issues we publish all year, on one of our favorite subjects, summer in (and around) the city.”

Newcity is looking for a wide range of meditations on the season, from the trenchant essay to the wistful memoir, from the dream state to the concrete. While they are not actively soliciting poetry, they’re not ruling it out, either.

They are also looking for learned and practical insights into summer (how to pack a proper picnic for Pritzker Pavilion, how to make the perfect summer cocktail, how to bbq on the lakefront), regional travel service pieces (what’s shakin’ at the House on the Rock? Is Detroit really the Chicago of the future?), and even itsy bitsy bon mots about a few of your favorite things about summer in Chicago. Please be specific in your pitch letter.

See summer.newcity.com for an archive of previous summer issues and see their guidelines page for more information. The deadline for copy for the Summer Guide is Saturday, May 18th, but sooner is better.

Extended Deadline, Visiting Writers Program, & More

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If you haven’t yet submitted your work to the Fourth Annual Spring English Conference, you’re in luck!

The submissions deadline has officially been extended to Monday, April 8th, at 11:59 p.m.

Submission guidelines remain the same and you can find them here.

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The Visiting Writers Program has two exciting on-campus readings taking place this week.

On this Thursday, April 4th, poet Jay Baron Nicorvo will be reading from his book Deadbeat at 6:00 p.m. in room 115 of the Richardson Library. You can read the complete details on our previous post.

On Monday, April 8th, the Visiting Writers Program will host a reading with DePaul’s own Prof. Ted Anton. Anton will be reading from his new book, The Longevity Seekers, at 6:00 p.m. in room 115 of the Richardson Library.

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Anton has spent years interviewing and working with scientists at the frontier of longevity science, and his book offers a behind-the-scenes look at their state-of-the-art research and the impact it might have on global health, society, and even our friends and family. Brenda Fowler, author of Iceman, describes The Longevity Seekers as, “A lively and at times humorous account of the search for the ‘longevity genes,’ told from the perspective of the pioneers in the field. Anyone with an interest in the new science of aging or the ways in which business and the media influence science is sure to enjoy this book.”

All Visiting Writers Series events are free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!

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Youth Organizations Umbrella (Y.O.U.), a Chicago-area youth development agency that provides services and leadership to meet the emerging needs of young people by offering free after-school enrichment, mentoring, clinical counseling, and crisis intervention to more than 850 low-income youth annually, is pleased to announce its Inspire Fellows Program for the summer of 2013. The fellowship offers graduate and upper-undergraduate students a full-time opportunity to learn best-practices in youth development and to prepare for a career in youth development, education, or the non-profit sector.

Inspire Fellows serve as workshop leaders and counselors for Y.O.U.’s 9-week summer program. Fellows are chosen to develop and facilitate specific workshops in one of three areas: arts and literature, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), or recreational activities. Additionally, all fellows help lead discussions and workshops on life skills topics.

Primary responsibilities of Inspire Fellows include:

  • Develop and facilitate youth activities in your chosen area that promote academic, social, and emotional development
  • Supervise youth activities in a safe, sensitive, developmentally appropriate, positive manner
  • Maintain positive, supportive relationships with youth
  • Nurture supportive relationships with parents, school administrators, teachers, students, and community representatives
  • Develop and maintain good working relationships with supervisors, coworkers, and volunteers within Y.O.U., and with others in the community who offer information about, resources for, or services to young people in Evanston
  • Maintain timely and accurate records concerning youth participation and outcomes
  • Identify and recommend opportunities for continuous improvement in Y.O.U. programming

The Fellowship experience offers a unique opportunity for growth for students thinking about a career in youth development, education, the arts, or non-profits. Fellows have close supervision of their work and are provided with both formal and informal feedback to help them grow. In this way, fellows develop their leadership skills, enhance their understanding of youth development, and build their non-profit management skills.

The Fellowship runs full time from June 10 through August 16. The first week offers Fellows a comprehensive orientation and training on Y.O.U., non-profit management, and positive youth development. The next nine weeks consist of high-impact summer programming.

The Fellowship offers a stipend of $1,000. (Y.O.U. is also glad to provide documentation to any students who receive support from their universities for summer employment with a non-profit organization).

For more information and to apply, visit www.inspirefellowsprogram.org. For questions, contact Kathryn Cai at kathryn.cai@youevanston.org or 847-866-1200 ext. 247.

Rita Leganski to Give Keynote Speech at Spring English Conference & More

Rita Leganski ap1 credit Neil GormanWe are excited to announce that Rita Leganski will be the keynote speaker at this year’s Spring English Conference. Leganski is a 2009 graduate of DePaul’s MAWP program, and this February she celebrated the release of her first book The Silence of Bonaventure Arrow, a magical realist tale in the Southern Gothic tradition, which started out as a short story in Dan Stolar’s fiction class. We are honored to have Leganski speak at the conference, and we hope her presence encourages participation in this great student-run event.CFP flyer

As a reminder, the Spring English Conference is taking place on the afternoon of May 3rd, 2013, in Arts & Letters Hall. The keynote speech will begin at 7:00 p.m. The submission deadline is April 2nd, so we hope you keep the conference in mind while working on your finals week revisions! Visit the 2013 Submission Guidelines page for complete details.

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All DePaul students and alumni are invited to the next ASK Networking Breakfast, the subject of which is “Lifelong Learning,” on Tuesday, March 19th, 2013, 8:00 – 9:00 a.m., in the Loop Campus, DPC, 11th Floor, DePaul Club.

Critical to the success of a modern career is one’s own drive for continuous learning and development. But what does lifelong learning look like? Leading a discussion on this question at the March ASK Networking Breakfast will be ASK mentors Michelle Dash and Colleen Fashing.

ASK Advisory Board Member and ASK Mentor Michelle Dash is a User Experience Lead at Roundarch Isobar. She facilitates the planning process of various web sites by researching user needs, organizing information and developing web site strategies. She received an MS degree in Human Computer Interaction from DePaul University and a BA in Psychology from the University of Michigan.  ASK mentor Colleen Fashing is Associate Director of Alumni Relations at DePaul University. She is also an adjunct faculty member in DePaul’s College of Communication. Colleen oversees alumni career services and volunteer opportunities. She obtained a BA from Eastern Illinois University and MA from Governors State University and she currently sits on the Board of Directors for the Eastern Illinois University Alumni Association.

Enjoy light breakfast, lively conversation, and open networking with ASK mentors, alumni professionals, and students.  Open to DePaul students, alumni, faculty, and staff.

To register, visit http://bit.ly/DePaulASKEvents. You can read more about the event at http://bit.ly/ASKBreakfastMarch2013.

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Chicago magazine, the nation’s largest city monthly, is seeking an Assistant Editor to assist the editor in chief and edit and produce content for the culture section. If you consider yourself to be creative, organized, hard worker, and a self starter and have the desire to work for the best magazine in the Midwest, then please apply now!

Responsibilities:

  • Perform standard assistant duties for the editor in chief, including answering his or her phone; making appointments and travel arrangements; and doing his or her expense reports.
  • Draw up some contracts for freelancers; prepare a report every month on how the edit budget was spent.
  • Help to assign, edit, produce, and possibly write some departmental content (especially for Go, the back-of-the-book culture section, under the supervision of the Senior Culture Editor).
  • Be available to help fact check stories and pitch in with reporting stories if necessary.
  • Handle some general office administrative duties, such as ordering office supplies.

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree, ideally in the liberal arts; a journalism graduate degree preferred but not required.
  • Internship experience at a major magazine, newspaper, or website is preferred.

Apply for this job at corporate.tribune.com/pressroom/?page_id=2600.

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Quiddity International Literary Journal has a position open for a managing editor. The position is full-time and salaried with benefits. The start date is June 1st, 2013.

Summary:

  • Manage the production of Quiddity‘s international literary journal (print and electronic components), radio program, and website, upholding all quality, calendar, and budgetary expectations; manage and advance the distribution of Quiddity‘s international literary journal and public-radio program through traditional and emerging venues.

Essential Job Responsibilities:

  • Oversee the submission systems (electronic and traditional) and acquisition processes for the print journal reading series, and radio program, including the coordination of query and galley correspondence as well as reading series proposals and contests
  • Coordinate and execute all editing and production schedules for the journal, radio, and website; coordinate the production schedule for the public-radio program; coordinate editorial board and staff meetings; support editorial board and staff through production processes
  • Advance Quiddity‘s subscriber base, listener base, readership, and distribution using established and emerging resources
  • Perform the layout for the journal’s interior print pages and its electronic format(s), design covers and promotional materials, manage web design, and expand web content
  • Supervise and mentor student interns and cultivate Quiddity‘s internship program, as well as other duties as assigned relative to academic affairs

Minimum Job Requirements:

  • MA, MFA, or MSc in Creative Writing, English, Communications, or related field
  • At least one year of experience with a print publication or journal of national distribution
  • Teaching experience with potential to supervise internships

Specific Skills:

  • Must possess savvy graphic design skills and be well versed in user-friendly, multimedia web development and social media
  • Proficiency in web design software and CSS, Adobe InDesign, Adobe Audition (or similar software) Outlook, Excel, Access, File Transfer Protocol
  • Exceptional reading, writing, and proofing skills
  • Outstanding professional communication skills
  • Established track-record of organizational management and follow-through
  • Ability to work under pressure and meet deadlines
  • Ability to work outside of regular business hours when necessary
  • Ability to work as part of a collaborative team

Supervisory Responsibility:

  • Supervise and mentor undergraduate student interns enrolled in Quiddity’s internship program

Other Functions:

  • With the approval of both the division chair and the supervisor, may teach courses in the Writing and Publishing and Communication Arts degree programs for an additional stipend at the qualifying adjunct pay rate

Working Conditions:

  • Twelve-month position, forty hours per week performed in-office, on-campus

Send resume or CV and letter of application detailing experience to Quiddity, 1500 N 5th Street, Springfield, IL 62702

Review of applications begins immediately.

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Mental Floss is looking for a few new freelance contributors for their website in history, science, language, movies, literature, and other topics. Here are some recent favorites they have selected to give you an idea of what the site is all about: stumbleupon.com/lists/482127620363011216.

Mental Floss typically pays $100 per web story. Many of their web writers go on to write for the magazine, which might be more exciting and definitely pays better, but right now they are only hiring for the site.

If you’re interested, send links to three great stories you’ve written to deputy editor Erin McCarthy (erin@mentalfloss.com), and include one pitch (a headline and a paragraph to convince the editors they absolutely need it).

For more examples of recent stories, follow @mental_floss.

Call for Papers, Gulf Coast Writing Contest, & More

The DePaul English Department is excited to announce a Call for Papers for the Fourth Annual Spring English Conference. This student-run conference, formerly known as the EGSA Conference, will be held on the afternoon of Friday, May 3rd, 2013 in Arts & Letters Hall.

We encourage all DePaul English graduate students to submit their works of fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, literary studies, and more by April 2nd, 2013.

Click over to the Spring Conference page on Ex Libris to get complete guidelines on how to submit your work. You can also browse archives of previous years’ conferences…and don’t forget to stay tuned to Ex Libris to hear about our keynote speaker!

The DePaul English Conference is an excellent opportunity for graduate and undergraduate students to showcase their work among a positive, supportive community of DePaul faculty and peers. If you have never publicly read your work before, consider this student-run conference. We look forward to making it a rewarding event for everyone involved!

Submissions and inquiries can be directed to: depaulenglishconference2013@gmail.com. 

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A final reminder that tomorrow, Friday, March 8th, is the last day to submit your creative work to Threshold, Depaul’s literary arts magazine!

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The DePaul Humanities Center extends its invitation to a reading with author and DePaul faculty member Christine Sneed on Wednesday, March ChristineSneed 03-13-13 finvers feb27fin13th, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in room 314 of the DePaul Student Center. Prof. Sneed will be reading from her new novel, Little Known Facts, recently featured on the cover of the New York Times Book Review. (You can read Ex Libris’s recent writeup of Sneed’s new book here.)

Christine Sneed teaches creative writing at DePaul University. Her first book, Portraits of a Few of the People I’ve Made Cry, was a 2009 AWP Grace Paley Prize winner, a finalist for the 2010 Los Angeles Times Book Award, winner of the 2011 John C. Zacharis First Book Award from Ploughshares, and winner of the Chicago Writers Association 2011 Book of the Year. The San Francisco Chronicle also chose Portraits as one of the fifty best fiction books of 2011.  Her short fiction has appeared in a number of literary journals, including PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, Best American Short Stories, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, Meridian, and Pleiades.

All are invited to attend this unique opportunity to hear from a gifted writer, one of DePaul’s own, reading from just-published work for free.

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And finally: There’s only one week left to submit to the annual Gulf Coast Prizes–the Gulf Coast Prize Contest closes March 15th. The contest awards a total of $6,000 to poets, essayists, and fiction writers. This year’s judges are Stanley Plumly (Poetry), Maggie Shipstead (Fiction), and Darin Strauss (Nonfiction/Lyric Essay).

The winner in each genre receives $1,500, and there are two $250 honorable mentions in each genre. The winners will appear in Gulf Coast 26.1, due out in Fall 2013, and all entries will be considered for paid publication on the Gulf Coast website as Online Exclusives.

Gulf Coast is accepting submissions both via the online submissions manager and via postal mail. The $23 reading fee includes a year-long subscription to Gulf Coast. The deadline for submissions is March 15, 2013. Only previously unpublished work will be considered. Fiction and nonfiction entrants may submit one piece, up to 7,000 words; poetry entrants may submit as many as five poems, up to ten pages. Multiple entries (or entries in more than one genre) are allowed, but entrants must pay a separate reading fee each time. Click here for how to enter.