A Three Course Meal of News, Literature, and Events

Dishes served at The Signature Room on the 95th floor of the Hancock Building are renowned for their exquisite flavor. Each dish, a balanced masterpiece, is served above the city and placed on the white tablecloths many pedestrians will never see. It’s the combination of different flavors, not to mention the ambiance, that gives each dish its particular character. Every note is accented, recognized as being an important part of the meal, the whole. Today’s Ex Libris is a happy compendium of news from all over the department. Read on to discover writing announcements, new publications, and cocktail parties. The beginning of the quarter is a tantalizing time filled with different flavors demanding student and faculty attention. It’s the fusion of all these different happenings that makes the Department of English a dish that rivals any on the 95th.

Academic Reminders

Today, September 17th, is the last day to add fall classes. This is it, last day, no turning back.  Go forward into that young book and discover.

Next Tuesday, September 24th, is the last day to drop fall classes.  If students drop a class before the 24th, it is not included in their tuition and will never appear on their transcript.  If students drop a class after the 24th, they pay for the course and it appears on their transcript as a Withdrawal (W).

October 29th is the last day to withdraw from fall classes.  Any student still on the roster after October 29th must earn a letter grade.

Partial Tuition Scholarships

The M.A. in English and M.A. in Writing and Publishing programs are offering Partial Tuition Scholarships (PTS) to recognize outstanding academic achievement of students in the English department’s two graduate programs. Partial Tuition Scholarships provide a partial reimbursement for tuition paid for 2013 autumn graduate courses in English taken toward the MAE and MAWP degrees.

To learn more about the requirements for the PTS click here.

The deadline for applying for PTS awards for the 2013 Autumn Quarter is Monday, September 23. All requests for PTS awards must be made electronically, and they must be sent to Ms. Hickey via email. Copies of this memo and of the application can be found on the MAE and MAWP D2L sites under “Content.”

The Guild Complex Writing Contest

Prose Contest 2013 (digital final) (2)The Guild Literary Complex has opened submissions for their Annual Prose Awards.  Each fall, the Guild recognizes emerging and established writers.  Winners will be announced during a ceremony at the historic Chopin Theatre in Chicago. Judges include Cristina Henríquez and our very own Prof. Miles Harvey.

Writers of all backgrounds and experience levels are invited to submit, and all themes and subjects are welcome. Illinois residents 18 years old and older should submit a single piece of short fiction or non-fiction of no more than a 1,000 words typed, to contest@guildcomplex.org. There is a $5 submission fee payable via the pay pal donation button on this page. Submission fee also includes admission to the live event. All applications must be completed by 5 pm on October 1, 2013

Newberry Center of Renaissance Studies Call for Papers

The Newberry Center of Renaissance Studies is calling for graduate papers for their 2014 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference. The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for maturing scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies.

Chosen papers will be published in a peer edited online conference proceedings page. The 2014 conference has expanded to accommodate 72 different presenters.

Abstracts for 15-minute papers from master’s or PhD students from any discipline on any medieval, Renaissance, or early modern topic in Europe or the Mediterranean or Atlantic worlds must be submitted by midnight, Tuesday October 15th. Complete this submission form.

The early conference registration fee will be $30 for students from consortium member universities and their guests and $40 for those from other institutions. Late registration (after January 10) will be $45 and $55, respectively.

New Publications

Kathleen Rooney has published a collaborative chapbook with Elisa Gabbert entitled The Kind of Beauty That Has Nowhere to Go. The chapbook has been released by feminist publisher Hyacinth Girl. Learn more about the publication and even order a copy from Hyancinth’s website. To tempt you, here is a poem from the book.

SOME NOTES ON REMORSE

Beware of people whose motto is “No regrets.” They are violent innocents. Ravaged by love.

I want a point of view that isn’t mine to tell me that what I did wasn’t wrong. And permission to be sorry for the outcome, but not the event.

If you can’t feel remorse, you may be a sociopath. This isn’t all bad. If you feel called to live your life like a dirty free-for-all, you can.

They say it’s better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all, but you make me wish I’d never been born.

Guilt is associated with the sound of bells tolling; remorse, the sound of wind through trees.

I would never say I’m sorry in a dream. However, I might set my most regrettable moments in the sky like a starry galaxy, and try to detect a pattern.

To show more remorse, lower your eyes. To show less, fix them up and ahead like an equestrian statue. In general, be blue-eyed and statuesque.

Don’t even try to tell me that swans mate for life. Do swans seem normal to you?

You may be sorry now, but you’ll be even sorrier if you get tear stains all over those satin sheets.

I was working my way up to an apology when a songbird lit upon my shoulder. Something in his tune made cruel jilting sound sweet. If my present self is the sum of my past actions, how can I be sorry?

Remorse smells like tallow soap and agony, but you can never wash it off. It does get fainter over time, like an exceptionally tenacious perfume.

To express remorse you must compose a detailed account of whatever offense you committed. Choose your font wisely; serifs are more emotive.

Thanks for the sympathy, but “buyer’s remorse” doesn’t really compare. Unless what you bought was from Satan.

We name our daughters by the traits we hope they’ll possess; she chose to name hers Rue.

The mental compartment where I store my remorse is the haunted garret in a mansion full of otherwise pleasant rooms.

Some people say there are five languages of apology.

I’m sorry you feel that way.

The EGSA Needs You

The English Graduate Student Association is celebrating the new school year with cocktails and beer at John Barleycorn on September 27th. Come revel in the great literary tradition of Dylan Thomas, Dos Passos, and Hemingway while meeting like minded graduate students looking to bring renewed passion to the EGSA. The event will kick off at 6:30 pm, and all are invited to attend.EGSADePaulFlyer1

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Extended Deadline, Visiting Writers Program, & More

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If you haven’t yet submitted your work to the Fourth Annual Spring English Conference, you’re in luck!

The submissions deadline has officially been extended to Monday, April 8th, at 11:59 p.m.

Submission guidelines remain the same and you can find them here.

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The Visiting Writers Program has two exciting on-campus readings taking place this week.

On this Thursday, April 4th, poet Jay Baron Nicorvo will be reading from his book Deadbeat at 6:00 p.m. in room 115 of the Richardson Library. You can read the complete details on our previous post.

On Monday, April 8th, the Visiting Writers Program will host a reading with DePaul’s own Prof. Ted Anton. Anton will be reading from his new book, The Longevity Seekers, at 6:00 p.m. in room 115 of the Richardson Library.

AntonVW

Anton has spent years interviewing and working with scientists at the frontier of longevity science, and his book offers a behind-the-scenes look at their state-of-the-art research and the impact it might have on global health, society, and even our friends and family. Brenda Fowler, author of Iceman, describes The Longevity Seekers as, “A lively and at times humorous account of the search for the ‘longevity genes,’ told from the perspective of the pioneers in the field. Anyone with an interest in the new science of aging or the ways in which business and the media influence science is sure to enjoy this book.”

All Visiting Writers Series events are free and open to the public. We hope to see you there!

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Youth Organizations Umbrella (Y.O.U.), a Chicago-area youth development agency that provides services and leadership to meet the emerging needs of young people by offering free after-school enrichment, mentoring, clinical counseling, and crisis intervention to more than 850 low-income youth annually, is pleased to announce its Inspire Fellows Program for the summer of 2013. The fellowship offers graduate and upper-undergraduate students a full-time opportunity to learn best-practices in youth development and to prepare for a career in youth development, education, or the non-profit sector.

Inspire Fellows serve as workshop leaders and counselors for Y.O.U.’s 9-week summer program. Fellows are chosen to develop and facilitate specific workshops in one of three areas: arts and literature, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), or recreational activities. Additionally, all fellows help lead discussions and workshops on life skills topics.

Primary responsibilities of Inspire Fellows include:

  • Develop and facilitate youth activities in your chosen area that promote academic, social, and emotional development
  • Supervise youth activities in a safe, sensitive, developmentally appropriate, positive manner
  • Maintain positive, supportive relationships with youth
  • Nurture supportive relationships with parents, school administrators, teachers, students, and community representatives
  • Develop and maintain good working relationships with supervisors, coworkers, and volunteers within Y.O.U., and with others in the community who offer information about, resources for, or services to young people in Evanston
  • Maintain timely and accurate records concerning youth participation and outcomes
  • Identify and recommend opportunities for continuous improvement in Y.O.U. programming

The Fellowship experience offers a unique opportunity for growth for students thinking about a career in youth development, education, the arts, or non-profits. Fellows have close supervision of their work and are provided with both formal and informal feedback to help them grow. In this way, fellows develop their leadership skills, enhance their understanding of youth development, and build their non-profit management skills.

The Fellowship runs full time from June 10 through August 16. The first week offers Fellows a comprehensive orientation and training on Y.O.U., non-profit management, and positive youth development. The next nine weeks consist of high-impact summer programming.

The Fellowship offers a stipend of $1,000. (Y.O.U. is also glad to provide documentation to any students who receive support from their universities for summer employment with a non-profit organization).

For more information and to apply, visit www.inspirefellowsprogram.org. For questions, contact Kathryn Cai at kathryn.cai@youevanston.org or 847-866-1200 ext. 247.

Irony and Excellence at the DePaul Humanities Center & More

The DePaul Humanities Center would like to invite everyone to attend the next event in their 2012-2013 series exploring Nostalgia and The Age of Enlightenment.

This Thursday, January 17th, 2013  at 6:00 p.m. in the DePaul Art Museum, Matthew Girson, Associate Professor of Art, Media and Design at DePaul, and H. Peter Steeves, Professor of Philosophy at DePaul, will lead a public participatory discussion entitled “Irony and Excellence after the Enlightenment? Yeah, Right. Sure.” The DePaul Humanities Center describes the evening’s topic as follows:

When modernity and the Enlightenment project revealed their final stages—a move toward irony, a rejection of authority, and a willingness to put the past aside—what became of art? And what became of our ability to talk about excellence, merit, and quality in art? An ironic culture may seem different from all that came before it, and yet, there are ways in which irony has, in some form or another, always been part of Western culture. Together, Girson and Steeves hope to flesh out some of the important questions concerning the status of art—and questions of value—in a fully-ironic postmodern age.

The experimental format for this event is a “public and participatory discussion.” Girson and Steeves will not read prepared lectures but will, instead, have a conversation with each other. After the groundwork is laid, the audience will be invited to join in the conversation rather than wait for the traditional Q&A period. It is hoped that this format will allow everyone to think together about irony and excellence, toward a common goal, with a common purpose.

Matthew Girson, a 2005-2006 Humanities Center Faculty Fellow, is Associate Professor and teaches all levels of painting and drawing in DePaul’s Department of Art, Media and Design. He also teaches for the Honors program and has offered courses in the First Year Program. His artworks have been exhibited locally, nationally, and internationally. Recently, an article that he wrote on Holocaust representation appeared in Lessons & Legacies XII, published jointly by the Holocaust Education Foundation and Northwestern University.

H. Peter Steeves is a Professor in the department of Philosophy at DePaul University and a 2001-2002 Humanities Center Faculty Fellow. His main areas of teaching and research include phenomenology, ethics, social-political philosophy, and the philosophy of science. His books include The Things Themselves: Phenomenology and the Return to the Everyday, (SUNY Press, 2006), Animal Others: On Ethics, Ontology, and Animal Life (SUNY, 1999), and Founding Community: A Phenomenological-Ethical Inquiry (Kluwer, 1998). Steeves is currently working on a variety of research topics, including the origin of life, postmodern aesthetics, the nature of mourning, and cosmology.

This event is free and open to the public.

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The DePaul Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity is pleased to announce that DePaul University will again participate in the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship Program. For more than 20 years, the DFI program and its predecessor programs have provided competitive need-based fellowships to underrepresented minority students who are pursuing graduate degrees from a participating Illinois higher education institution. Seven DePaul graduate students currently receive the DFI fellowship and several DFI Alumni serve as faculty or administrators at DePaul.

Students who attended our workshops in the past, tended to prepare stronger applications. We scheduled application workshops on the following dates:

Lincoln Park:

  • Wednesday, January 16, 10am to Noon: Cultural Center- Oscar Romeo Room, LPSC, rm. 105A
  • Thursday, January 17, 2pm to 4pm: Cultural Center- Oscar Romeo Room, LPSC, rm. 105A

Loop:

  • Wednesday, January 30, 10am to Noon: DePaul Center- DePaul Center Room 8002
  • Thursday, January 31, 3pm to 4:30pm: DePaul Center – DePaul Center 8011
  • Wednesday, February 6, 10am to noon: OIDE Conference Room

You can reserve a space: Click Here to RSVP for a DFI Application Workshop

The 2012-2013 DFI application are available on the IBHE homepage ibhe.org/dfi. More information about the DFI Fellowship, including eligibility information, is also the website also has eligibility information. DePaul students are required to submit the completed DFI Fellowship application to the Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity, 14, E. Jackson, Suite 800 on or before February 18, 2013, 4:00 p.m. CST.

Selection of award recipients in this rigorous competition is based on a comprehensive review of the application materials. All academic fields at the master’s and doctoral level will be considered for this award; however, the DFI Program Board has established the following priorities: applicants interested in obtaining a full-time instructional position in Illinois higher education, applicants in the first year of their graduate program, applicants pursuing degrees in any of the sciences, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) fields, and applicants pursuing a doctorate or other appropriate terminal degree.

Full-time enrollment is required during the fellowship period. Fellows must pursue and accept a full-time position in teaching or administration at an Illinois post-secondary educational institution, Illinois higher education governing board, or an educational-related position at a state agency following the completion of their graduate program for at least the same number of years that they receive the fellowship.

Students who apply for the DFI Fellowship must demonstrate financial need. Therefore, they must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) before being considered for the award. The FAFSA for the 2013 academic year will be available online in January 2013, fafsa.ed.gov. In order to meet the DFI application deadline, candidates should complete the online FAFSA application by February 1, 2013.

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And finally, a reminder for our MAE students: All current MAE students have received an email containing important information about the Capstone Portfolio Requirement, including information on the Capstone Portfolio Winter ’13 Information Session, which will be held on Saturday, January 19 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in the SAC 232.

If you plan on submitting your Portfolio in Winter ‘13, please review and respond to the email by January 18th, 2013. If you have any questions, please contact Prof. Shanahan at jshanah1@depaul.edu.

Student & Alumni News and More

DePaul English Graduate students had a very productive winter break– we received announcements from the following students about their recent awards and publications. Are you a student or graduate with news to share about an award, publication, job, or other accomplishment related to your degree? Email Maria at mhlohows@depaul.edu to be featured in Ex Libris’s Student & Alumni News.

Congratulations to Bethany Brownholtz (M.A.W.P. ’12) on getting a poem published in the December 2012 edition of Broad Magazine, the online publication of Loyola University Chicago’s Women’s Studies & Gender Studies department. Bethany’s poem, entitled “What it’s like to look at her legs,” can be read along with the rest of the issue here.

Congratulations as well to current M.A.W.P. student Mikki Kendall, who has had a nonfiction essay published on the web magazine xoJane. Click over to xojane.com/entertainment/on-behalf-of-willow-smith-and-girls-like-her-shut-up to read Mikki’s essay, entitled “On Behalf Of Willow Smith And Girls Like Her: Shut Up And Keep Your Concerns To Yourself.”

And finally, congratulations to Raul Palma, also a current M.A.W.P. student, who recently had one short story published and other pieces place in two writing contests. Raul’s story “Amaranthus,” which he originally wrote for Christine Sneed’s Triptych class in fall 2012, was published by 34th Parallel literary magazine. Another short story of his, “Obsolescence,” was a finalist in Cutthroat Magazine‘s 2012 Rick DeMarinis Short Story Contest, and an excerpt from Immaculate, a novella he produced in Amina Gautier’s Novella Writing class last winter, placed in Glimmer Train literary magazine’s Family Matters contest.

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Lastly, a brief reminder: Are you a current or prospective DePaul English graduate student interested in pursing a graduate assistantship for the 2013-2014 school year? If so, please note that there are only five days left to get your applications in before the deadline of January 15th, 2013.

See las.depaul.edu/english/Programs/Graduate/About/Graduate_Assistantships for complete details.

How to Become an Editor, Grants for Grad Students, & More

Reminder: As current grad students are enrolling in Winter Quarter classes this week, don’t forget to check the course descriptions for Winter 2013 and Spring 2013. Many course times, locations, and descriptions have been updated– some of them very recently!

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The English Department is excited to announce their next Career Panel: “How to Become an Editor.” This panel will take place on Tuesday, October 30th from 6:15-7:15 p.m. in Arts & Letters Hall room 308.  Panelists will include Donna Seaman, senior editor for Booklist, Jonathan Messinger, co-publisher of Featherproof Books, and Perrin Davis, senior vice president of editorial services at Agate Publishing. All are welcome and snacks will be provided. Click on the flyer for more information about the three panelists.

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An important reminder for all MAE and MAWP students: You can request support funds for your research!

In 2010, the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences established the Graduate Research Funding program (GRF). The GRF works to support DePaul graduate students in their pursuit of research and scholarship by covering expenses related to the planning, implementation, and dissemination of research and scholarship, both internal and external to the university community. Awards vary in amount up to $1500, depending on research activities: $1500 for international travel, $500 for domestic, and $300 for a research project. All full-time and part-time graduate students in good standing are eligible to apply. Students can only apply once in an academic year.

The GRF program helps support graduate students in activities specifically related to research, scholarship, and creative work, such as

  • Short-term travel expenses for research or creative work
  • Travel expenses to present papers at academic conferences

Applications are accepted four times a year during the academic year. The GRF is a re-imbursement system. Original receipts can be submitted both before and after conference presentations.

More information can be found at: las.depaul.edu/Research/Graduate/GrantProgram.asp and by asking MAE Director Prof. John Shanahan (jshanah1@depaul.edu) or MAWP Director Michele Morano (mmorano@depaul.edu).

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The DePaul Office for Institutional Diversity and Equity is pleased to announce that DePaul University will again participate in the Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois (DFI) Fellowship Program. For more than 20 years, the DFI program and its predecessor programs have provided competitive need-based fellowships to underrepresented minority students who are pursuing graduate degrees from a participating Illinois higher education institution. Seven DePaul graduate students currently receive the DFI fellowship and several DFI Alumni serve as faculty or administrators at DePaul.

Students who attended DePaul’s workshops in the past tended to prepare stronger applications. This year’s scheduled application workshops are on the following dates:

Loop:

  • Monday, November 5, 2012
    10:00 – 12:00 a.m.    
    1 E. Jackson, Suite 8002

Lincoln Park:

  • Tuesday, November 6, 2012
    2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
    2250 N. Sheffield Ave., Room 325

You can reserve a space:  Click Here to RSVP for a DFI Application Workshop

The 2012-2013 DFI application will be available in November 2012 on the IBHE homepage www.ibhe.org/dfi. More information about the DFI Fellowship, including eligibility information, is also the website also has eligibility information. DePaul students are required to submit the completed DFI Fellowship application to the Office of Institutional Diversity and Equity, 14, E. Jackson, Suite 800 on or before February 18th, 2013, 4:00 p.m. CST.

Selection of award recipients in this rigorous competition is based on a comprehensive review of the application materials. All academic fields at the master’s and doctoral level will be considered for this award; however, the DFI Program Board has established the following priorities:  applicants interested in obtaining a full-time instructional position in Illinois higher education, applicants in the first year of their graduate program, applicants pursuing degrees in any of the sciences, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) fields, and applicants pursuing a doctorate or other appropriate terminal degree.

Full-time enrollment is required during the fellowship period. Fellows must pursue and accept a full-time position in teaching or administration at an Illinois post-secondary educational institution, Illinois higher education governing board, or an educational-related position at a state agency following the completion of their graduate program for at least the same number of years that they receive the fellowship.

Students who apply for the DFI Fellowship must demonstrate financial need. Therefore, they must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) before being considered for the award.  The FAFSA for the 2013 academic year will be available online in January 2013, www.fafsa.ed.gov. In order to meet the DFI application deadline, candidates should complete the online FAFSA application by February 1, 2013.

Spring PTS Awards, Student News, and More

Current MAE and MAWP students, check your email! The English Department is offering Partial Tuition Scholarships (PTS) to recognize outstanding academic achievement of students in its two graduate programs. Partial Tuition Scholarships provide a partial reimbursement for tuition paid for Spring 2012 graduate courses in English taken toward the MAE and MAWP degrees.

You are eligible to apply for a PTS award if:

  • You have already completed at least two English graduate courses toward your MAE or MAWP degree
  • You are enrolled in one or more English graduate classes for the current fall term
  • You have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.7 or higher
  • You are paying your own tuition and fees (without financial assistance from any grant or scholarship agency or employee reimbursement program–student loans are okay.)

Application forms have been emailed to all current MAE and MAWP students, and can also be found on your MAE or MAWP D2L page under “Content.” Completed applications as well as any questions or concerns should be sent to Jan Hickey at jhicke11@depaul.edu. The deadline for applications is Friday, April 20th.

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In Student News: Congratulations to Andrea Pelose (MAWP) for getting a poem published in Burningword literary journal! Andrea wrote her poem, entitled “A Tired Performer in Another Half-Assed Season,” in Prof. David Welch’s Fall multi-genre course, Constraint and Restraint. You can read the poem for free here. Nice work, Andrea!

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The Guild Literary Complex  is launching a new series, Teaching Artist Showcase, which explores the creative work of writing teachers. The first event will combine readings from two university professors, Bayo Ojikutu and S.L. Wisenberg, along with a brief Q&A about writing, teaching and learning. As a special addition to this launch event, there will be 18 open mic spots for students from Chicago’s various university creative writing programs. There can be up to 2 participants per school, and each participating student will be allotted 2 minutes. Work shared can be poetry, prose or theater. Please secure your spot with your department coordinator before it’s gone.

This event will take place on Wednesday, April 11th from 7:00-8:30 pm at the Experimental Station, 6100 S. Blackstone. Admission is free, and a university ID is needed for the contest. Click on the flyer for complete details.

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Have you been keeping up with the DePaul Radio’s Student Writers Series? If not, you may want to hop over to their blog and check out several new episodes they have uploaded in the last few weeks, featuring DePaul student writers Jessica Olson, Meredith Boe, Sally Weigel, Bryan Kett and Jared Gerling. Information about submitting your work to the show is also available on the blog.

Hannah Pittard Reading, Call for Papers from Purdue, SLS Writing Contest, and DFI Fellowship Information

Join us this THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 at 6 p.m., for a reading by DePaul’s own Professor Hannah Pittard at the DePaul University Bookstore at 1 East Jackson in the Loop.

Prof. Pittard wrote the critically acclaimed novel, The Fates Will Find Their Way. She is also the winner of the 2006 Amanda Davis Highwire Fiction Award, the recipient of a 2012 MacDowell Colony Fellowship, and a consulting editor for Narrative Magazine.

This event is free and open to the public.

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The American Studies Program at Purdue University announces its 37th annual Symposium to be held April 19-20, 2012, and they have just announced an Extended Submission Deadline: January 30, 2012 for the symposium’s call for papers. This event is organized by graduate students and focuses on the presentation of graduate student work. In acknowledging the importance of interdisciplinary studies, the Symposium Committee invites papers from students of all disciplines to engage the theme “National Tragedies: Perceptions, Receptions, and Expectations.”

The theme of “National Tragedies” seeks to interrogate those moments and events in both history and contemporary society, which have affected the American psyche consciously and/or unconsciously. A focus on Perceptions assesses how various peoples in America and even those beyond America’s geo-political borders have defined tragedies and nations, politically, socially, economically, and environmentally. Receptions aims to uncover the varied responses to and reflections upon these tragic moments and decipher what they mean both nationally and transnationally for America. Finally, Expectations seeks to develop and foster an understanding about national tragedies cross-culturally, within and without the nation.

With a focus primarily on past and present transnational developments in America, the theme seeks to initiate scholarly conversations that theorize upon instances within American history which have been instrumental in defining how America views itself as a nation as well as how America is viewed by other nations. Possible proposal topics from interdisciplinary perspectives include, but are not limited to:

  • Critical Race Theory, Whiteness Studies
  • Cultural Amnesia
  • Cultural Studies, Popular Culture Studies
  • Eco-Feminism, Environmental Studies
  • Education and Pedagogy Studies
  • Gender, Queer Theory and Sexuality Studies
  • Literary Studies
  • Othered Social Groups
  • Religious Studies

The Symposium Committee invites all those interested to submit proposals no longer than one page in length for panels, individual papers, workshops, and performances no later than January 30, 2012. Please also submit a biography of no more than 250 words, a current CV with contact information (especially your email address), and a list of any audio and/or visual equipment necessary for your presentation. Submissions must be made electronically to amstsymposium@purdue.edu.

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Summer Literary Seminars, a dynamic international literary and cultural program, has announced the upcoming deadline for their annual literary contest. Submit your poetry, fiction, or nonfiction by February 28th, 2012 for what is going to be the largest SLS contest to date:

*Seven places to be published. Five major prizes. Three all-expenses paid trips. Six additional prizes. A considerable number of contest-based fellowships. One contest. Enter today!*

*Enter our 2012 Unified Literary Contest at sumlitsem.org/contest now for your chance to win an all-expenses paid trip to one of our groundbreaking 2012 programs.  Winners will be published in North America’s leading literary online and print journals,  and will receive free tuition (including airfare and accommodations) to a 2012 SLS Program. *

Visit the Summer Literary Seminars website for complete details concerning their programs as well as full contest guidelines.

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The DFI Fellowship is an award made available to graduate students with the goal of increasing the number of minority full-time tenure track faculty and staff at Illinois’ two- and four-year, public and private colleges and universities. DePaul University currently has seven graduate students who receive the DFI Fellowship, and they are generously offering a series of information sessions for current DePaul graduate students interested in applying.

A DFI Fellow must be an Illinois resident and U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident alien who is a member of an Underrepresented Group. Black/African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, American Indian or Alaskan Native. “Traditionally underrepresented minority group” means any of the minority groups designated in the Public Act which are represented in Illinois post-baccalaureate enrollment at a percentage rate less than the minority group’s representation in the total Illinois population. The Public Act further specifies that to be classified as an Illinois resident, an applicant must possess a high school diploma or postsecondary degree from an accredited Illinois educational institution or have lived in Illinois for at least three years.

For more information, please read DFI Guidelines or visit their website.

The next DFI Fellowship Application Training Sessions are scheduled on the following dates:

  • Tuesday, Jan. 24 at 10:00 am; OIDE Office 14 E. Jackson, Suite 800 (Loop)
  • Thursday, Jan. 26 at 2:00 pm; DePaul Center Room 8002 (Loop)

Private sessions (approximately 30 minutes), scheduled by appointment on a first come first serve basis:

  • Wednesday, February 1 at 1:30 – 4 pm; OIDE Office 14 E. Jackson, Suite 800 (Loop)
  • Friday, February 3 at 1:30 – 4 pm; Center for Intercultural Programs-Founders Room, 2250 N Sheffield Ave, Suite 105 (Lincoln Park)

RSVP to diversitymatters@depaul.edu and indicate the session you’d like to attend. Walk-ins are welcome.