Autumn 2013

2013 Autumn Quarter Class Schedule & Descriptions

The Autumn Quarter 2013 schedule is still subject to change. Check back for updates, and thank you for your patience and understanding.


ENG 400 – Structure of Modern English
Meyer, Wed 6:00-9:15, LPC

A systematic outline of modern English from both traditional and contemporary linguistic perspectives. Examines descriptive grammars, word and phrase structure, syntax and semantics, and formal issues of style and rhetoric.

Language and style core requirement in the MAE and MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 407 – Language & Style for Writers
Meyer, Tues 5:45-9:00 p.m. LOOP

A comprehensive examination of structural and stylistic devices that accomplished writers use in creative and literary nonfiction contexts. Topics include sentence emphasis and rhythm, coherence, point of view, authorial stance, and rhetorical aspects of sentence structure, repetition, and punctuation.

Language and style core requirement in the MAE and MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 411 – Chaucer
Kordecki, Tues 6:00 p.m.- 9:15 p.m. LPC

Medieval period requirement in the MAE. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 428 – Studies in Shakespeare: Race and Gender
Royster, Thu 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

Renaissance period requirement in the MAE. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 432 – Studies in Restoration and 18th Century Drama
Shanahan, Mon 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

This course explores issues of genre, performance, and sexuality in some dazzling plays of the period 1660-1780. We will study the first actresses and the performance of gender; illusion, disguise, and epistemology; generic instability and innovation; the comedy of manners; adaptations of Shakespeare. Authors will include Wycherley, Behn, Etherege, Cavendish, Dryden, Racine, Congreve, Gay, Fielding, Lillo, Townley, Goldsmith, and Sheridan.

18th Century period requirement in the MAE. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 469 – Topics in 19th Century American Literature: Abolitionist Print Culture
Dinius, Wed 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

Technical revolutions in printing technology coincided with the massive expansion of the antislavery movement in the antebellum United States.  This course will examine a range of printed documents–pamphlets, poems, almanacs, slave narratives, novels, woodcut prints and engravings–and the roles that they played in making slavery the issue in the national conversation prior to the Civil War.  We will consider how the mass production of print combined with the postal service to amplify what began as a relatively few voices against slavery; how abolitionism and the pro-slavery alike blurred the line between fact and fiction; and issues of class and gender in relation to race-related print.  Likely readings include David Walker’s Appeal, abolitionist poetry and newspapers, various slave narratives, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Hanna Crafts’s The Bondwoman’s Narrative.

19th Century period requirement in the MAE. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 471 – Bibliography and Literary Research: The New Bibliography 
Gross, Thurs 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

In the 1980s, Jerome McGann’s A Critique of Modern Textual Criticism challenged the Gregg-Bowers-Tanselle approach to literary editing, focusing on the fact that single editions of works were no longer tenable or desirable. McGann’s Radiant Textuality discusses the implications of the world wide web for editing. He notes how editing specific nineteenth century texts, such as the works of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, challenged him to think in new ways about the field of bibliography. We will consider how editors have struggled with the tasks assigned to them, by reading Alexander Pettit’s collection of essays which discusses editions of Faulkner, Conrad, Cather and other writers. We will also look at specific internet sites, such as the Blake Archive, the Rossetti project, Romantic Web Circles, and the Dickens website to conduct research.  Students will learn to write abstracts in preparation for presentations at scholarly conferences.

Core requirement in the MAE. May NOT be used for credit in the MAWP.


ENG 474 – Teaching Literature
Goffman, Mon 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

This course prepares students to teach introductory literature courses at the secondary and post-secondary (primarily community college) levels. The course includes examination of the profession of teaching literature, its history, and changing practices. The course is practical and collaborative: we will address pedagogical approaches to different genres and consider diverse, sometimes contradictory, ways to teach literary works. Students will design and practice assignments in a workshop environment. The final project is a complete Course Plan that includes syllabus and assignments.

Lang/Lit/Teaching/Publishing requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 475 – Topics in Literature: Colonization and Its Legacy
Fairhall, Thurs 6:00-9:00 p.m. LPC

Description pending.

20/ 21st century period requirement in the MAE. Elective in the MAWP.


ENG 477 – Topics in Publishing: Digital Publishing
Thomas, Wed 5:45-9:00 p.m. LOOP

In a matter of years, a publishing industry dominated by print is now increasingly, and irreversibly, digital. Most professional or technical writers and editors need a web-first, if not a web-only, attitude and approach. They write for myriad purposes and audiences, and in myriad styles and formats. In addition, they must edit and produce audio and video content (i.e., rich media), and learn how to aggregate their work with that of others, and disseminate it via all the social and professional media tools at their disposal. This course aims to better equip students for digital-driven careers. It is hands-on, project-based, and designed for students to share their skills and experiences.

Lang/Lit/Teaching/Publishing requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 477 – Topics in Publishing: Outreach Press
Harvey, Mon 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

This course–part an innovative book-publishing sequence that gives students hands-on experience in editing, publishing, and promoting a real book—will focus on distribution and development. Students will gain hands-on experience in the distribution of How Long Will I Cry?: Voices of Youth Violence, a book created by DePaul students in 2012-2013. They will also begin the planning and development of a new book.

Students are welcome to take any or all three of these courses. No prerequisite.

Lang/Lit/Teaching/Publishing requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 484 – Writing Workshop: Writing the Memoir
Borich, Tue 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

In this graduate creative nonfiction writing course, we class read, write and workshop literary memoir— first-person narratives illuminating memory, personal history, and other accounts of actual lived experience through the use of evocative description, engaging reflection, and all kinds of prose structures. We explore craft and process issues central to the memoir writer’s work, such as: the line between memory and invention; writing about friends and family; and working with difficult personal material. We also discuss the technical elements of artful memoirs, such as character, setting, narrative focus and time management.  Students read example texts, write and revise essay-length memoir drafts, and participate in creative writing peer workshops.

Writing workshop requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 484 – Writing Workshop: Multi-Genre Forms in Non-Realism
Welch, Tue 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

Participants in this multi-genre workshop will explore how writing and reading about unreal events can lead to a heightened engagement with the world in which we live. Studying forms including folktales, surrealism, magical-realism, and metafiction, we’ll discuss how individual devices such as plot, tone, and character can be tweaked in order to differentiate otherwise realist perspectives. Participants will write and workshop fiction and poetry as well as develop individual manifestos detailing their idiosyncratic relationships to (non)-realism. Possible course texts include essays, fiction, and poetry by John Barth, Jorge Luis Borges, Anne Carson, Mina Loy, Karen Russell, and James Tate.

Writing workshop requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 487 – Travel Writing
Morano, Thurs 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

In this workshop, students will craft the raw materials of experience, memory, and sometimes research into travel essays. In our writing and reading we’ll grapple with concepts of truth, accuracy, and authority, as well as with questions about the very nature of travel. What does it mean to travel? Why do we do it? What do we gain in the process of uprooting ourselves, and what do we lose? By turning away from the simple answers to these and other questions, and by excavating material for its depth and richness, students will begin to shape preliminary writings into pieces of literature that both engage and enlighten the reader.

Writing Workshop requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 490 – Writing for Magazines
Anton, Thurs 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

A cutting edge immersion in the latest practices in the field of magazine writing, in print or on the web.  Students will learn to pitch, report, write and revise  articles ranging from memoirs to music and museum reviews.  Students write two stories and meet guest  professional editors in Chicago.  We hope to sell the stories and launch you on your way in a supportive, fun class atmosphere.

Writing Workshop requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 492 – Writing Fiction
Pittard, Mon 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

On the surface, the first-person narrative seems a straightforward affair. did this. did that. think this. I think that. But the truly brilliant first-person narrative tells not only the intended story, but also several ostensibly unintended ones as well. In this class, we’ll discuss the difference between author and narrator, and talk about the relationship each has with the reader; we’ll read published first-person narratives and write our own; and we will attempt to put our finger on the often subtle — yet undeniably magical — difference  between the successful first-person narrative and the unsuccessful one.

Writing Workshop requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 493 – Writing Workshop: Writing Poetry
Jones, Wed 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

“Writing Poetry” is a seminar in writing and reading poetry. Class will be conducted in a workshop format with emphasis on class discussion of student writing. At the end of the semester each student will turn in a final portfolio of finished poems.

Writing Workshop requirement in the MAWP. Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


ENG 496 – Editing
Mulderig, Wed 6:00-9:15 p.m. LPC

An introduction to editing principles and practices in professional and technical fields.

Elective in the MAE and MAWP.


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