Faculty News: Ted Anton’s Nonfiction Book Release

In Faculty News, we are excited to announce the upcoming release of Professor Ted Anton‘s new book, The Longevity Seekers: Science, Business and the Fountain of Youth, which will be released by the University of Chicago Press on May 1st, 2013.

In addition to The Longevity Seekers, Anton has written two other books, Bold Science: Seven Scientists Who Are Changing Our World (2001) and, Eros, Magic and the Murder of Professor Culianu (1996), and co-edited a collection called The New Science Journalist.

The Longevity Seekers is a nonfiction account of the scientific search for a longevity gene. From the press release:

longevityseekersPeople have searched for the fountain of youth everywhere from Bimini to St. Augustine. But for a steadfast group of scientists, the secret to a long life lies elsewhere: in the lowly lab worm. By changing the expression of just a few key genes, these scientists were able to lengthen worms’ lifespans up to ten-fold, while also controlling the onset of many of the physical problems that beset old age. As the global population ages, the potential impact of this discovery on society is vast—as is the potential for profit.

With The Longevity Seekers, science writer Ted Anton takes readers inside this tale that began with worms and branched out to snare innovative minds from California to Crete, investments from big biotech, and endorsements from TV personalities like Oprah and Dr. Oz. Some of the research was remarkable, such as the discovery of an enzyme in humans that stops cells from aging. And some, like an oft-cited study touting the compound resveratrol, found in red wine—proved highly controversial, igniting a science war over truth, credit, and potential profit. As the pace of discovery accelerated, so too did powerful personal rivalries and public fascination, driven by the hope that a longer, healthier life was right around the corner. Anton has spent years interviewing and working with the scientists at the frontier of longevity science, and this book offers a behind-the-scenes look at the state-of-the-art research and the impact it might have on global public health, society, and even our friends and family.

With spectacular science and an unforgettable cast of characters, The Longevity Seekers has all the elements of a great story and sheds light on discoveries that could fundamentally reshape human life.

“If live to be 150 — and thanks to Ted Anton I now know how – I doubt I will ever read a book about the
science of aging as enthralling as The Longevity Seekers. John Seabrook, New Yorker

“Research, money, and ego are the basic ingredients in the modern day quest to live longer—or forever. Ted Anton takes us into the laboratories and boardrooms in the worldwide competition for longevity, and with expertise and wit tells a wondrous story of contemporary science.”   Daniel S. Greenberg, author of Science for Sale

Although The Longevity Seekers doesn’t hit the shelves until May 1st, the DePaul community has a special chance to hear Anton read from the book TONIGHT. Please join Prof. Anton and the Visiting Writers Program on Monday, April 8th at 6:00 pm in the Richardson Library room 115 for this event, which is free and open to the public. You can see the details and the event flyer in this previous post.

Anton will be doing another reading event for The Longevity Seekers in May at DePaul’s Loop campus. Please check back with Ex Libris to find out when the date, time, and location of this reading are announced.

Faculty News: Barrie Jean Borich Releases New Memoir

In today’s Faculty News, we extend our congratulations to Prof. Barrie Jean Borich. Borich joined DePaul’s creative writing faculty last fall, and this spring she is celebrating the release of her third creative nonfiction book, Body Geographic. Body Geographic is published by the University of Nebraska Press and was selected for inclusion in the American Lives Series, edited by Tobias Wolff.

From the official press release:

A memoir from the award-winning author of My Lesbian Husband, Barrie Jean Borich’s Body Geographic turns personal history into an inspired reflection on the points where place and person intersect, where running away meets running toward, and where dislocation means finding oneself.

One coordinate of Borich’s story is Chicago, the prototypical Great Lakes port city built by immigrants like her great-grandfather Big Petar, and bodygeographicthe other is her own port of immigration, Minneapolis, the combined skylines of these two cities tattooed on Borich’s own back. Between Chicago and Minneapolis Borich maps her own Midwest, a true heartland in which she measures the distance between the dreams and realities of her own life, her family’s, and her fellow travelers’ in the endless American migration. Covering rough terrain—from the hardships of her immigrant ancestors to the travails of her often-drunk young self, longing to be madly awake in the world, from the changing demographics of Midwestern cities to the personal transformations of coming out and living as a lesbian— Body Geographic is cartography of high literary order, plotting routes, real and imagined, and putting an alternate landscape on the map.

Body Geographic is as astonishingly original as it is profoundly humane. Barrie Jean Borich writes of the body, the psyche, the land, and real life with a reach so grand and a mastery so definitive it clutches the heart. This is a beautiful, bold, blow-your-mind book.”
—Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild

Body Geographic is dizzying in its inward sweep, daring in its out-flung absorption. Barrie Jean Borich tunnels through time, space, sex, and language to give us a new map projection of the North American continent, a distortion that not only clarifies and illuminates but dissolves for good the boundary between personal and public history.”
—Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home and Are You My Mother?

“Borich maps place and body, time and space, personal history and the history of the American Midwest, in prose that makes me want to follow her daring journey wherever it leads. A glorious new take on the memoir form.”
—Dinty W. Moore, author of Between Panic and Desire

The Chicago leg of Borich’s Body Geographic book tour starts next month and includes the following events:

Friday, April 12th,  2013 at 7:30 p.m.
Body Geographic‘s Chicago book launch
Barrie Jean Borich reading from BODY GEOGRAPHIC
Melanie Hoffert reading from PRAIRIE SILENCE
Women & Children First, 5233 N. Clark St.

Thursday, May 9th,  2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Barrie Jean Borich reading from BODY GEOGRAPHIC
Rachael Hanel reading from WE’LL BE THE LAST ONES TO LET YOU DOWN
The Book Cellar Chicago, 4736-38 N Lincoln Ave.

Tuesday, May 21st,  2013 at 6:00 p.m.
DePaul University Writers’ Series
Richardson Library, Room 115

Passionate Professors Flyer

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Borich will also be one of two professors featured in Sigma Tau Delta’s “Passionate Professors” event taking place tomorrow, Tuesday, March 12th from 5-7 p.m. in Room 202 of Arts & Letters Hall.

Christine Sneed will be the other featured professor, and both will be discussing their recently released books.

See the flyer for more details.

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Finally, there’s a way to get even more involved in the Body Geographic book launch. From now until March 16th, Borich is asking everyone to create a visual response— a photo, a drawing, etc.,– to the prompt “The Map That Made Me.”

You can email your image to bodygeographic@gmail.com, post the map on the Barrie Borich WHAT IS THE MAP THAT MADE YOU_Nonfiction-Universe Facebook page, or tweet your map with some kind of identifying info @BOOKofBJB.

The goal of the project is to post as many maps as possible, as an “autogeography slide show” online as a visual community conversation about places, bodies, and memories. All invited to participate, and you do not have to be an artist.

Click to enlarge the flyer for complete details.

For more information about Borich, Body Geographic, and “The Map That Made Me,”– including a book trailer– visit barriejeanborich.com.

Faculty News: Christine Sneed’s Debut Novel

In Faculty News, congratulations to Prof. Christine Sneed. This week marked the release of Sneed’s debut novel, Little Known Facts. From the official press release:

sneed_little_known_factsThe people who orbit around Renn Ivins, an actor of Harrison Ford-like stature—his girlfriends, his children, his ex-wives, his colleagues in the film industry—long to experience the glow of his flame. Anna and Will are Renn’s grown children, struggling to be authentic versions of themselves in a world where they are seen as less-important extensions of their father. They are both drawn to and repelled by the man who overshadows every part of them.

From Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalist Christine Sneed comes the debut novel LITTLE KNOWN FACTS (Bloomsbury / February 12, 2013 / $25, hardcover), which peels back the layers of fame, family, and identity surrounding a charismatic Hollywood star. With each chapter from the point of view a different person caught in Renn’s web of celebrity, Sneed shows us the man in full and the effects of fame on the people to whom he is closest. Will, in his late twenties, is unmoored, has never had a real job. Anna is an earnest and hardworking medical intern who eventually falls for a married man of her father’s age. The first Mrs. Ivins can’t seem to keep a relationship going in the years since her marriage fell apart because no man can stand in Renn’s shadow. The second Mrs. Ivins has just published an expose titled This Isn’t Gold. Most of us can imagine the perks of celebrity, but Little Known Facts offers a clear-eyed story of its effects—the fallout of fame and fortune on family members and others who can neither fully embrace nor ignore the superstar in their midst.

With Little Known Facts Christine Sneed emerges as one of the most insightful chroniclers of our celebrity-obsessed age, telling a story of influence and affluence, of forging identity and happiness and a moral compass.

Little Known Facts is juicy enough to appeal to our prurience but smart enough not to make us feel dirty afterward…Sneed is such a gifted writer…Her depiction of both proximity to  celebrity and celebrity itself had me totally convinced.” – Curtis Sittenfled, New York Times Book Review (cover)

“An entertaining, formally inventive read …the world that Sneed creates in Little Known Facts — a blend of truth and fiction that weaves real life actors and directors into Renn’s everyday life — makes for a clever take and a fun read.” – Los Angeles Times

 “Sneed follows her award-winning short story collection, Portraits of a Few of the People I’ve Made Cry, with an ensnaring first novel that delves into the complex challenges and anguish of living with and in the shadow of celebrity. Sneed’s wit, curiosity, empathy, and ability to divine the perfect detail propel this psychologically exquisite, superbly realized novel of intriguing, caricature-transcending characters and predicaments…As Sneed illuminates each facet of her percussively choreographed plot via delectably slant disclosures––overheard conversations, snooping, tabloids, confessions under duress, and journal entries, among them—she spotlights ‘little known facts’ about the cost of fame, our erotic obsession with movie-star power, and where joy can be found.” – Booklist, starred review

Book reviews and Q&A’s with Sneed have been popping up everywhere from the Tin House blog to Time Out Chicago. You can read them all at www.christinesneed.com.

Women and Children First bookstore, located at 5233 N. Clark Street, will be hosting a release party for Little Known Facts tonight, Thursday February 21st, from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Sneed will also be reading from Little Known Facts on DePaul’s campus on Wednesday, March 13th as a part of the DePaul Humanities Center’s New Voices in the Humanities series. Join her at 5:30 p.m. in the DePaul Student Center room 314 for a reception; the reading begins at 6:00 p.m. More information and a flyer to come!

Early Modern English Literature Candidates on Campus & More

In the coming weeks, the DePaul English Department will be holding a series of Student Information Sessions with the candidates for the Assistant Professor of Early Modern English Literature, a tenure-track position in The Department of English to begin in September, 2013. A total of three sessions will be held in ALH 210-11, one for each candidate. All DePaul English Graduate Students are encouraged to attend and give their input.

The first Student Information Session will be held tomorrow, Friday, January 18th, with Evan Gurney of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Gurney’s background includes:

  • Ph.D. in English Literature, ABD; Dissertation: “Discontented Charity: Theology, Community, and Hermeneutics, More to Milton” (Adviser: Reid Barbour)
  • M.A. in English, 2007; Thesis: “Donne Redone: Alexander Pope’s Imitation of Satire II” (Adviser: Jessica Wolfe)
  • B.A. in English and Creative Writing (with Highest Honors and Highest Distinction), 2004

The student Q&A will be held from 1:30-2:15 in the Student Resource Center, ALH 210-11. Refreshments will be provided. If you are unable to attend any of these sessions, you are invited to attend the English Department sessions which will be held from 3:30-5:00 on the same days. The English Department looks forward to hearing your feedback.

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Engendering Change: The Third Annual Graduate Student Gender and Sexualities Conference to be held on Thursday, March 14th and Friday, March 15th, 2013 at the University of Illinois at Chicago has announced an Extended Deadline for submitting abstracts. The deadline is now Tuesday, January 22nd.

Engendering Change is an annual interdisciplinary graduate student-led conference that provides a venue through which graduate students can share their scholarship on gender and sexualities with one another and get feedback from faculty based in the Chicago area. The conference is free and open to the public.

Graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in all academic disciplines are invited to present their original research related to the study of gender and sexualities broadly defined. Papers can be based on any aspect of gender and sexualities, including but not limited to: activism, bodies, families, feminisms, identities, health and medicine, masculinities and femininities, media, religion, sexual subcultures, transnationalism, and the workplace.

The conference will start on Thursday, March 14th, 2013 at 5:30PM with a special keynote event at the Jane Addams Hull House. Graduate student panels, as well as a themed faculty panel, will take place on Friday, March 15th, 2013 at Student Center East.

This year’s conference theme, “Thinking Intersectionally about Gender and Sexualities,” focuses attention on theorizing and researching gender and sexualities through an intersectional lens. In addition to the above noted topics, graduate students are encouraged to submit papers that bring intersectional theory in conversation with gender and sexuality studies, reflect on the state and future of intersectionality in gender and sexualities studies, and consider innovative methodological strategies for studying these intersections.

To submit an abstract, please complete the online submission form available at engenderingchangeconference.wordpress.com/cfp/submit-an-abstract. The submission form will ask for an extended abstract with a minimum of 350 words as well as keywords.

All presenters will be notified of acceptance by February 1st, 2013. Participants will be asked to submit their full papers to the conference committee by March 1st, 2013.

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The literary magazine Palooka is seeking new material for an upcoming issue, and has issued a call for submissions to DePaul English Graduate students.

Palooka is a nonprofit literary magazine seeking fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, plays, graphic short stories, graphic essays, comic strips, artwork, photography, and multimedia. Palooka produces print and electronic versions of the magazine and offers samples of the published materials online.

In the words of the editors, “We’re determined to find those writers and artists who are hungry and relevant, flying under the radar, producing great works that are going unnoticed by other magazines. We read absolutely everything sent to us, word-for-word, right down to the very last juicy sentence. This is a magazine for everyone, but we’re really into publishing the up-and-comer, the underdog in the literary battle royale. Give us your best shot. We dare you.”

Please see the following links for more details and submission instructions:

Homepage: palookamag.com
Previous issues: palookamag.com/issues
How to submit: palookamag.com/submit

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And finally, Plume Poetry, the online journal edited by Daniel Lawless, is celebrating the publication of its first print anthology on January 24th at 6 p.m. at POWELL’S at 1218 South Halsted.

Plume1 24 13jpg

Plume Poetry has extended a special invitation to all DePaul English students to join poets Robin Behn, Stuart Dybek, Angie Estes, William Olsen, Christina Pugh, and Daniel Bosch for a free reading from the anthology and a great kick off for the still new year. You can learn more about Plume Poetry at plumepoetry.com.

NEIU Visiting Writers Series, Student News, & More

Today in student news, congratulations to Trudie Gauerke (M.A.W.P.) who has just had a poem published in The Penwood Review. Trudie’s poem, “What Is the World to Me,” appears in the Fall 2012 issue of The Penwood Review, a quarterly literary journal “established to embrace high quality poetry of all kinds, and to provide a forum for poets who want to write intriguing, energetic, and disciplined poetry as an expression of their faith in God.”

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The new Creative Writing faculty in the English Department of Northeastern Illinois University are eager to share the details of their brand-new Visiting Writers Series. Six incredible writers are already on the schedule to read to come and read for this year’s series, including DePaul’s own Amina Gautier, who will be reading from and discussing her award-winning short story collection, At-Risk.

Prof. Gautier will be reading on November 1st, but please see the poster for the full list of NEIU Visiting Writers Program events. All students and faculty are invited to come and join NEIU for as many of these events as you can. They are free and open to the public.

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Students at Columbia College are hosting a very special reading and would like to invite students from DePaul to participate.

The event, called Prose and Flows, will be held Tuesday, October 16th from 8:00 p.m. to midnight (doors open at 7:00 p.m.) as a part of a series of jazz-inspired evenings at the Shrine, 2109 S. Wabash. There will be jazz music playing and students will be invited to come up and read their poetry, short fiction and prose. It’s an informal, after-class event that’s a good opportunity for students to test their writing out in front of an audience.

If you have any questions, please contact Ashley Nycole Smith at ashnycole88@yahoo.com.

Faculty and Alumni News, and a Graduate Open House

 

In Faculty News, congratulations to Prof. Nancy Grossman of the DePaul Honors Program, who is celebrating the publication of her first book, a Young Adult novel entitled A World Away. All are invited to join the friends and colleagues of Prof. Grossman at a reading, signing, and reception to celebrate the publication of her novel, on Tuesday, October 23rd at 6 p.m. in the Barnes & Noble Loop store at the corner of State and Jackson. Copies of A World Away will be available for purchase.

MAWP students interested in YA fiction should take special note of this event and of Prof. Grossman’s Spring 2013 Writing Workshop in YA fiction.

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In Alumni News, Gina Linko (M.A. in Writing ’01) has also written a new Young Adult novel, Flutter, which debuts from Random House later this month.  Gina would like to cordially invite everyone in the DePaul community to celebrate the book’s release at the White Oak Library in Romeoville, IL on Saturday, October 27th from 2- 4 p.m.  There will be books for purchase, free snacks, and a giveaway for a Nook. Flutter is also available for pre-order on Gina’s Amazon page. Congratulations, Gina!

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And finally, an announcement for our prospective students. Are you not yet a part of the DePaul English Graduate Programs but are considering applying? If so, please join us for the DePaul University Fall Graduate Open House. Faculty and staff representatives from more than 75 graduate programs will be available to talk to you about specifics of each program and answer any questions that you may have. A representative from the office of financial aid will also present an overview of the graduate financial aid process.

Programs in all of DePaul’s colleges and schools will be represented. Arrive early to hear from a panel of graduate admission directors who will answer  frequently asked questions and give an insider’s perspective to the inquiry and application process at DePaul.

The Open House will be held on Thursday, Oct. 11th, from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. in Room 120 of the Student Center on the Lincoln Park Campus. The event is free, but you are asked to register at admevents.depaul.edu/event.aspx?id=7755

For more information about the Graduate Open House please call 773-325-8312 or email us at gradevents@depaul.edu

Early October Events

Believe it or not, next week begins the month of October, and once again, there are tons of great literary events happening on and around campus. Grab your calendars, and we’ll see you there!

One Book One Chicago at Depaul- Oct. 2nd and 10th

Every year, the city of Chicago and Chicago Public Libraries host a series of events for the One Book, One Chicago (OBOC) program, an “opportunity to engage and enlighten our residents, foster a sense of community and create a culture of reading in our city.” DePaul University is proud to be the host of two OBOC events this October:

The Book Thief and the History of Reading
Tuesday, October 2nd, 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus
Arts and Letters Hall, Room 207
2315 N. Kenmore Avenue
For The Book Thief’s Liesel Meminger, reading is a means of both resistance and reconciliation. With attention to literature’s changing material and interpretive practices, DePaul faculty—Jenny Conary and Marcy Dinius, English; Lisa Z. Sigel, History; and Traci Schlesinger, Sociology—discuss what it has meant to be a reader in different times and places, from early modern Europe to today. Sponsored by DePaul University’s Department of English.

The Book as Object
Wednesday, October 10th, 7:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus
John T. Richardson Library, Room 400
2350 N. Kenmore Avenue
A book exists as more than just a vessel for the written word—it’s an artwork, a collectible and, of course, a target for thieves. Join librarian Kathryn DeGraff and artist Matthew Girson, along with cultural critic Rachel Shteir, author of The Steal: A Cultural History of Shoplifting, as they discuss various personal and cultural ways of experiencing The Book beyond reading. Sponsored by DePaul University’s Department of English.

To find out more about OBOC, this year’s selection, and other events around the city, visit the official OBOC events page. All OBOC events are free and open to the public.

Rose Metal Press Flash Nonfiction Reading- Sept. 28th

Rose Metal Press, co-founded by the DePaul English Department’s Kathleen Rooney, will be celebrating the release of their new book The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction, which “features 26 eminent writers, editors, and teachers offering expert analysis, focused exercises, and helpful examples of what make the brief essay form such a perfect medium for experimentation, insight, and illumination” with a reading this Friday, September 28th.

The reading will take place at The Book Cellar, located at 4736-38 N Lincoln Ave., and will feature readings by new DePaul faculty member Barrie Jean Borich, as well as Phillip Graham, Jenny Boully and Sue William Silverman, who are all featured in the collection. This event is free and open to the public. See the event page for more information.

DePaul Humanities Center Presents: Indigenous Poetry- Oct. 4th

The DePaul Humanities Center invites everyone to join them at the opening event for the Humanities Center’s New Voices in the Humanities series on Thursday, October 4th, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in room 314 of the DePaul Student Center (a reception will precede at 5:30 pm) for an evening of poetry and discussion with three of North America’s most exciting young Indigenous poets.

Natalie Diaz, Santee Frazier, and Orlando White will read selections from their poetry, followed by a discussion and audience Q&A moderated by DePaul Professor Mark Turcotte, exploring ways in which the poets’ Native beliefs and traditions influence and are expressed in their art.

Click on the poster to read more about this event and its three featured poets.

Visiting Writer’s Series: “Writer as Editor/ Editor as Writer” – Oct 5th

The second event in the DePaul Visiting Writer’s Series features Phong Nguyen and Michael Nye and is entitled “Writer as Editor/Editor as Writer” and it takes place on Friday October 5th from 11:30 AM-1:30 PM in Room 115 of the Richardson Library. Lunch will be served.

Please click on the poster for more information about the two featured writers and their upcoming conversation.

Society of Midland Authors Presents: An Evening with Mahmoud Saeed – Oct. 9th

Chicago author and DePaul Visiting Professor Mahmoud Saeed, a native of Iraq, will discuss his novel The World Through the Eyes of Angels, in a Society of Midland Authors program Oct. 9th at the Cliff Dwellers Club, along with one of his translators, Allen Salter of Chicago.

Saeed has written more than 20 novels and short story collections, starting with “Port Saeed and Other Stories” in 1963. That same year, Iraq’s first military-Baathist government seized two of his novels and imprisoned him for a year. After being incarcerated six times, Saeed left Iraq in 1985. He has lived in the United States since 1999, and he now teaches Arabic and Arabic culture at DePaul University.

Salter has lived and traveled in Latin America, Europe and the Middle East. He has worked as a teacher and translator. Under the pseudonyms Sam Reaves and Dominic Martell, he has published 10 novels.

They will speak at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at the Cliff Dwellers Club, 200 S. Michigan Ave., 22nd floor, Chicago. A social hour, with complimentary snacks and a cash bar, begins at 6 p.m. Reservations are not required. Admission is free, but the Society will accept donations to defray the cost of programs. For more information, see www.midlandauthors.com.