TODAY: Master Class and Reading with Eileen Pollack

Please remember today’s Master Class with visiting novelist and essayist Eileen Pollack, who recently won the prestigious Grub Street National Book Prize.

Eileen will be reading and discussing work by JENNIFER HOUGHTON, JENCY KANICHIRAYIL and ANGEL WOODS. Copies of their pieces are now available at the third-floor front desk of the English Department.

All students are welcome at this event, which takes place TODAY, Thursday, April 12th, from 3:30-5 p.m. in Rosatti Room 300 of the John T. Richardson Library in Lincoln Park. Please plan on being there. Everyone will benefit from hearing the response of a successful author to these drafts.

Please also plan to attend Eileen Pollack’s reading that same day at 6 p.m. in room 115 of the library.

Student News and a Freelance Job Posting

Today Ex Libris is excited to bring you two Student News announcements:

Rhiannon Falzone (MAWP) has had an essay published in The Violet, an online quarterly magazine based in California. Rhiannon’s essay, entitled “Let Her Go,” appears in the spring issue, which has the theme of Rebirth.

Rhiannon had previously read parts of “Let Her Go,” on the DePaul Radio Student Writers Series, but had to cut it to 1200 words before sending it to The Violet. “[It] brought out my love of editing,” Rhiannon says, “At first it felt a bit daunting, but I actually love this version much more.” You can read the essay at thevioletonline.com. Congratulations Rhiannon!

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Congratulations also to MAWP students Jennifer Houghton, Jency Kanichirayil, and Angel Woods, who have been selected to take part in Thursday’s master class with noted novelist and essayist Eileen Pollack. Thanks to everyone who submitted work.

All students are welcome at this event, which takes place this Thursday, April 12, from 3:30-5 p.m. in Rosatti Room 300 of the John T. Richardson Library in Lincoln Park. Please plan on being there to support Jennifer, Jency, and Angel, and benefit from hearing the response of a successful author to their drafts. The Master Class will be followed by a reading by Eileen Pollack at 6 p.m. in room 115 of the library.

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Connect Search, LLC is looking for a technical writer for a contract job in Evanston. It is a 4 month contract, possibly longer. Applicants must have experience with Adobe InDesign. Here are the details:

Responsibilities: Planning and writing a variety of technical documentation deliverables, including user guides, online help content, administration guides, and API documentation for web and mobile software.

Qualifications:

Required

  • 3+ years of experience creating technical documentation or user assistance deliverables for software
  • Experience writing for both end users and software developers
  • Experience documenting large Web-based applications
  • Superior writing skills, with an emphasis on clarity and structure.  Review of example work product will be part of the interview process.
  • Must be proficient with Adobe In Design

Preferred

  • BS/MS, preferably in Technical Communications, English, or Computer Science
  • Experience documenting APIs (Java or .NET preferred)
  • Experience documenting XML technologies, including Web services
  • Experience documenting mobile applications

Work environment: This is an individual contributor role, working in our Evanston location.  Work is non-routine and complex, working directly with Development teams to understand and translate technical concepts, designs, and completed product features into written materials readily understood by a non-technical audience.

For more information on Connect Search, please visit www.connectsearchllc.com.  To apply for the position, please contact Erin Bauer, Vice President of Recruiting at ebauer@connectsearchllc.com, 312-422-1600 Office, or 312-422-1601 Fax.

One Book One Chicago Kickoff, EGSA Conference Keynote Speaker Announced, and More

*REMINDER* Today, Monday April 9th, is the last day to drop a class with no penalty. After today, a “W” will appear on your transcripts if you withdraw.

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The deadline for submissions to the April 12th master class with Eileen Pollack has been extended until 9 a.m. TOMORROW, TUESDAY APRIL 10th. This is an exciting opportunity for graduate students in both fiction and creative nonfiction. Pollack is the author of the new novel, Breaking and Entering, which was awarded the 2012 Grub Street National Book Prize and named a New York Times Editor’s Choice selection. She is also a gifted nonfiction author whose innovative textbook and anthology, Creative Nonfiction: A Guide to Form, Content, and Style, with Readings, was published in 2009 by Wadsworth/Cengage.

If you would like to submit work for consideration for this Master Class, please email an essay or single piece of short fiction to Miles Harvey (mharvey7@depaul.edu) by 9 a.m. tomorrow.

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This year’s One Book, One Chicago programming kicks off this week, and DePaul is hosting the first One Book, One Chicago event of the season:

Gold Boy, Emerald Girl in Conversation
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus
John T. Richardson Library
Room 300 (The Rosati Room)
2350 North Kenmore Avenue

All are invited to join DePaul University Department of English professors June Chung, Jim Fairhall, Rebecca Johns-Trissler, and James H. Murphy as they offer a roundtable discussion exploring the affinities between Yiyun Li’s Gold Boy, Emerald Girl and a variety of contemporary and canonical authors, including William Trevor and Anton Chekhov.

Remember to check back with Ex Libris as well as the One Book One Chicago Tumblr site for more OBOC events at DePaul and all around the city.

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Sigma Tau Delta, the English Honors Society, is presenting a reading and workshop by novelist Joe Meno tomorrow, April 10th, at 6pm in the Brownstone Annex on first floor of the DePaul Student Center. All students are welcome to attend. Please see the flyer for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

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This Friday, April 13th is the 2012 EGSA Spring Conference. The day of panels presented by DePaul English graduate students will conclude with a keynote speech by writer and visiting professor Mahmoud Saeed.

EGSA is honored to present Mahmoud Saeed, who will participate in a reading and discussion of his work. He is an award-winning Iraqi writer of more than twenty short story collections and novels including Saddam City and The World Through the Eyes of Angels. The event will take place in the auditorium of Arts & Letters Hall at 7:15, immediately following the conference panels.

All EGSA Conference events, including the Keynote speech, are free and open to the public. Please see the flyer for more details.

Master Class with Eileen Pollack at DePaul, South Africa’s Poet Laureate in Chicago, and More

The MAWP is pleased to announce an exciting opportunity for graduate students in both fiction and creative nonfiction to work with visiting writer Eileen Pollack. In addition to her reading on the evening of April 12, Pollack has agreed to conduct a Master Class, in which she will discuss the work of three graduate students in the MAWP.  Anyone may attend the actual class, but the work of only three graduate students will be discussed.

Mark your calendars for Thursday, April 12, 2012:

Master Class with Eileen Pollack
3:30-5:00
Location (on Lincoln Park campus) TBA

Reading by Eileen Pollack
6:00 p.m.
Location (on Lincoln Park campus) TBA
Free & open to the public

Eileen Pollack is the author of the new novel, Breaking and Entering, which was awarded the 2012 Grub Street National Book Prize and named a New York Times Editor’s Choice selection. In addition to writing novels and short stories, Pollack is a gifted nonfiction author whose textbook, innovative textbook and anthology, Creative Nonfiction: A Guide to Form, Content, and Style, with Readings, was published in 2009 by Wadsworth/Cengage.

If you would like to submit work for consideration for this Master Class, please email an essay or single piece of short fiction to Miles Harvey (mharvey7@depaul.edu) by Friday, April 6th.  And even if you don’t submit, mark your calendars!  Everyone will benefit from hearing the response of a successful author to these drafts.

Eileen Pollack is the author of a collection of short fiction, The Rabbi in the Attic And Other Stories, a novel, Paradise, New York, and a work of creative nonfiction called Woman Walking Ahead: In Search of Catherine Weldon and Sitting Bull, which won a 2003 WILLA finalist award. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Michener Foundation, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, and the Massachusetts Arts Council. She teaches creative writing at the University of Michigan.

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Professor Keorapetse Kgositsile, the Poet Laureate of South Africa, will be in Chicago on Tuesday, April 10th.  All are invited to a poetry reading and poetry workshop that Professor Kgositsile will conduct at the UIC Daley Library. The Poetry Reading is at 4pm and the Poetry Workshop is at 6pm.

Creative writing students who would like the opportunity to have Professor Kgositsile workshop a poem of theirs must submit a one–page poem along with your name, email address, university affiliation and phone number to eopadmin@uic.edu by April 6th. For complete instructions, click to view the flyer on the left.

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Story Club, Chicago’s open mic for stories, will have their next show on April 5th at Uncommon Ground in Wrigleyville.

The show, which will center around the theme, “Fire,” is featuring stories by director/actor/writer Kelly Anchors, and actor/writer Andy Marikis. In addition, five open mic participants will get a chance to burn it up by sharing their own 1st person stories. Open mic sign up starts at 8pm, names are drawn from the hat, participants are given 5-8 minutes.

Also – new this show – everyone who attends will have the opportunity to put their name in the hat for our Story Challenge.  The audience picks the theme, chance picks the performer, and that lucky person has a month to create their story and present it at May’s Story Club. Challenge accepted.

The show is free but dinner reservations in Uncommon Ground’s music room guarantee seating – call 773-929-3680. The seats go fast so reservations are highly recommended.

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SouthWest Writers is seeking entries for their annual writing contest. First through third place winners will be awarded in twelve categories of fiction, nonfiction, children’s literature, screenplays, and poetry. All first place winners will automatically compete for the grand prize, the Storyteller Award. The entries must be original, unpublished and in English. You do not have to be a member of SouthWest Writers (SWW) to enter.

Entries must be submitted by mail and must be postmarked by May 1st, 2012. To see a complete list of categories and submission instructions, and to download application materials, please visit southwestwriters.com/contestRules.

Dangerous Territory: Reflection on Master Class with William Lychack

By M.A.W.P. student Shane Zimmer

Last Thursday I took part in a Master Class with author William Lychack as part of the Visiting Writers Program at DePaul. I was one of three fortunate M.A.W.P. students who had their stories selected for the hour-and-a-half workshop. Along with Javaria Afghani and Amanda Gibson, I had the opportunity to talk shop with the author of The Wasp Eater and The Architect of Flowers.

Lychack took time to respond to each of our stories candidly. Though he had comments for each individual piece, he shared one particularly memorable insight that applied to all three of us. Our stories, he said, seemed to stop short of crossing into dangerous territory.

What exactly is dangerous territory?

If I understood Lychack correctly, it’s the place where characters get themselves in the most trouble. It’s where they confront their deepest fears and desires, where they cannot hide from their vulnerabilities and they are forced to view themselves and their relationships in the most revealing light.

Rather than being abstract, Lychack identified specific scenes (or lack of scenes) in all of our stories that could have crossed into dangerous territory. I can’t speak for Javaria or Amanda, but in my story I missed a few opportunities to get my protagonist in trouble. He went through the gestures of transformation without showing proof that his change was real.

Speaking generally, it was a great help just to be reminded how important it is to keep a lookout for dangerous territory and to reveal my characters by propelling them directly into its heart.

Lychack also shared five questions he learned from the writer Charles Baxter. These are the first questions he asks himself and his students when responding to a story:

  1. What’s the story about?
  2. What does the main character want?
  3. What is he/she afraid of?
  4. What do you remember most from a story? Or, as the writer, what are you trying to hand over to the reader?
  5. What is idiosyncratic about the story? What in the story is yours?

DePaul’s Professors Miles Harvey, Richard Jones and Michele Morano, plus several students, contributed their own questions and insights. All together their input made for a fruitful discussion on narrative craft. Such conversations are why I enrolled in this program. It is always a humbling experience to present a piece of writing in a workshop, thinking it’s near to finished, and then discovering how many ways the piece can be improved. The workshop is dangerous territory in itself, and one I am always glad to have entered.

Thanks to Professor Harvey and the Department of English for arranging the Master Class and thanks to William Lychack for taking the time to share his wisdom.

Three M.A.W.P. Students Selected for William Lychack Master Class

The M.A.W.P. is delighted to announce that Javaria Afghani, Amanda Gibson and Shane Zimmer have been selected to take a master class with visiting writer William Lychack this week. Congratulations to these three students—and thanks to all those who submitted work. The quality of the entries was strong and the competition was fierce.

Please plan on attending this master class, which is open to the public. It’s a great opportunity to get to learn from an accomplished short-writer and novelist, and to get to know the work of your fellow graduate students.

Master Class with William Lychack
Thursday, April 14
3:30 p.m.
DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus
Student Center, Room 325

For more information on the reading later that day, please read this post.

Master Class and Reading with William Lychack

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Master Class with William Lychack
3:30-5 pm
Location (on Lincoln Park campus) TBA

Reading by William Lychack
6 pm
Richardson Library, room 400
2350 N. Kenmore
Free & open to the public

The MAWP is pleased to announce an exciting opportunity for graduate students to work with visiting writer William Lychack, author of The Architect of Flowers, a new short-story collection that novelist Charles Baxter describes as “an amazing accomplishment, very complex and exceptionally beautiful.” In addition to reading from his work on the evening of April 14, Lychack has agreed to conduct a Master Class, in which he will discuss the work of three graduate students in the MAWP. Anyone may attend the actual class, but the work of only three graduate students will be discussed.

If you would like to submit work for consideration for this Master Class, please email a single piece of short fiction to Miles Harvey (mharvey7@depaul.edu) by Monday, April 4. And even if you don’t submit, mark your calendars! Everyone will benefit from hearing the response of a successful author to these drafts.

William Lychack’s work has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize, The American Scholar, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, and other places, including public radio’s This American Life. He is the author of a novel, The Wasp Eater, and currently lives in Stamford, Vermont, and teaches in the Low-Residency MFA Program at Lesley University.