Threshold Release Party, Two Job Postings, & More!

All are invited to the release of Threshold’s 33rd edition!

threshold sign(1)

The Threshold release party will be held at the DePaul Art Museum, 935 W. Fullerton from 5:00-7:00 p.m. Along with free copies of the publication, there will be music provided by members of the DePaul Jazz Ensemble, readings and performances from the publication, beverages, and hors d’oeuvres.

Please join Threshold in celebrating this issue and honoring the work of its student contributors and staff.

***

DePaul’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program has extended the call for papers deadline for the upcoming national Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Programs (AGLSP) Conference to August 1st, 2013.

The theme of the conference, which takes place Oct. 10-12th, 2013 in Chicago, is “Urban Gateways: Immigration and the Global City.” They welcome presentation proposals that cross the disciplines from both faculty and graduate students; the conference will include Graduate Liberal Studies Programs throughout the US and Canada, and presents an excellent opportunity to showcase DePaul’s dynamic graduate students, faculty and programs.

For more information, see Ex Libris’s post on the original call for papers.

***

Northwestern University Press is hiring an Assistant Acquisitions Editor to handle the manuscript submission process from initial inquiry through transmittal to the manuscript editorial department.  This position prepares, proofreads, and executes book contracts.  The Assistant Acquisitions Editor oversees the process of working with authors as the authors secure permissions.  This position tracks, organizes, and distributes photos and illustrations.  The Assistant Acquisitions Editor works closely with authors to ensure submission of clean manuscript files for transmittal to manuscript editorial.

Specific Responsibilities:

  • Tracks manuscripts through the acquisitions process from submission through transmittal to manuscript editorial;
  • Works with authors and volume editors in preparation of electronic files;
  • Prepares, proofreads and executes contracts for new books and reprints;
  • Tracks status of contracts, digitizes and files them;
  • Communicates all relevant contract information to the Business Office;
  • Oversees payments of authors, publishers, agents, readers and translators, while working closely with the administrative assistant;
  • Maintains acquisitions schedule pre- and post-Press Board approval, tracking all manuscripts throughout the acquisitions process;
  • Maintains database of submissions;
  • Inputs information into the title management database and updates as necessary;
  • Creates and maintains detailed text and photo/illustration permission records;
  • Inputs all relevant data into Title Management databases and updates as needed;
  • Reviews unsolicited manuscripts prior to review by acquisitions editors or series editors;
  • Manages rejection process, including mailing and database;
  • Manages the peer review process for two full-time and two part-time acquisitions editors;
  • Follows up as needed with authors, series editors and editor-in-chief;
  • Performs related duties as required or assigned.

Minimum Qualifications:

  • A bachelor’s degree or the equivalent combination of education, training and experience from which comparable skills can be acquired;
  • Experience with contracts, permission and copyrights, superb attention to detail;
  • Ability to work independently and set priorities, publishing experience.

Visit the job posting page to get more details and apply.

***

The Cook County Clerk’s office is hiring a key writer and researcher for its Communications and Policy team. This staffer will conduct issue research and write press releases, reports, policy papers, fact sheets, briefing and outreach materials. They will also help disseminate our publications and educational materials on various platforms, from brochures to our website.

Requirements:

  • Minimum B.A. in Journalism, Communications, Political Science, Public Policy or related field, plus 3 years experience
  • Excellent writing and research skills
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Office, including Excel
  • Experience with online communications (i.e. website editing, blog publishing, Constant Contact) and research tools (i.e. Survey Monkey)
  • Social networking skills (i.e. Twitter, Facebook, etc.)

A background in issues pertaining to voting rights and democracy or similar public policy debates is a plus. Bilingual candidates who can speak and write Spanish are encouraged.

Please provide a cover letter, resume and two writing samples bundled in one pdf. Preferably, the writing samples should demonstrate different capabilities.

Standard Cook County benefits. Salary commensurate with experience.

Please email your application packet to countyclerk.hr@cookcountyil.gov with the subject line: “Policy and Press Secretary.”

Applications are due by June 18th, 2013.

Advertisements

Open Mic Poetry Night, A Job Opening, & a Faculty Fellows Event

All are invited to an Open Mic Poetry Night hosted by MAWP students Meredith Boe and Maria Hlohowskyj this Thursday, May 30th, at the Bourgeois Pig Cafe, 738 W Fullerton Ave, Chicago, from 8:00-10:00 p.m. If you are interested in reading, arrive a few minutes early to sign up, and have a short poetry selection prepared. Fiction and nonfiction are also welcome, as long as selections are under five minutes long.

For more details, you can join the Facebook event at facebook.com/events/327394267388656.

***

Triumph Books, the country’s leading sports book publisher, seeks an ultra-organized, proactive Acquisitions Coordinator to join its dynamic publishing team in Chicago. This is an entry-level position that supports all aspects of new title acquisitions. Primary responsibilities include maintaining a database of information on recently contracted and under-consideration titles, managing flow of title information between acquisitions and other departments, processing contracts and managing royalty advance payments, responding to unsolicited book proposals, researching sales of competitive titles, and a variety of other administrative tasks. The ideal candidate will be a self-starter with a passion for sports, who is also deadline-oriented and can happily multitask under tight deadlines. Proficiency in Microsoft Word, Excel, and Outlook is a must. Interested candidates should forward their résumés, cover letters, and salary expectations to Linda Matthews at lmatthews@ipgbook.com. No phone calls, please.

***

The final DePaul Faculty Fellows Series event of the year will be taking place on Saturday, June 8th, 2013, at 3:00 p.m. at the Seminary Co-op Bookstore, University of Chicago, 5751 S. Woodlawn Ave. All are welcome to attend as Faculty Fellow Black Hawk Hancock presents: American Allegory: Ralph Ellison and the Question of American Identity.

hancock 6-8-13 (2)“Black Hawk Hancock’s American Allegory: Lindy Hop and the Racial Imagination, forthcoming spring 2013 from the University of Chicago Press, is an ethnographic study of two forms of social dance—the Lindy Hop and Steppin—which draws its inspiration from the cultural criticism of Ralph Ellison. In doing so, it brings to the surface the racial tensions that surround white use of black cultural forms. Focusing on new forms of appropriation in an era of multiculturalism, American Allegory underscores the perpetuation of racial disparities and offers Ellisonian insights into the intersection of race and culture in America.

In celebration of the book’s publication, a colloquium will be held to discuss this Ellisonian inspired work, as well as Hancock’s Ellisonian infused work that has followed from it as a Fellow of the DePaul Humanities Center. This later work takes up three central themes of Ellison’s thought: the diverse ways Ellison approached issues of race, culture, music, literature, and politics in relation to American identity; the centrality of the seemingly ordinary, those often unheard and unseen aspects of African-American life, and American life more generally; and the Ellisonian conviction that American Identity is of a whole.

Taking Hancock’s work as a whole, this event brings together senior scholars Paul Willis, Professor of Sociology at Princeton University, and Mary Patillo, Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University, as interlocutors for an informal open-ended conversation about Ralph Ellison, race, culture, and the question of American identity.”

Black Hawk Hancock is an associate professor of sociology at DePaul University. His research focuses largely on issues of race and culture. His ethnographic work has appeared in Ethnography, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Sociological Perspectives, and Qualitative Sociology. His book American Allegory: Lindy Hop and the Racial Imagination is forthcoming spring 2013 from the University of Chicago Press.

Student News, H. Peter Steeves on Campus, & More!

Today in Student News, we’re excited to announce that not one but two current MAWP students will have poems published in After Hours Issue 27, Summer 2013.

Congratulations to David Mathews on the publication of his poem “Urban Archer.”

And congratulations as well to M.R. Byrd on the publication of his poem, “Athena.”

The Summer 2013 issue will be released at the Printers Row Book Fair, June 8-9th; if you’re at the fair, stop by the After Hours table to pick up a copy and check out David and M.R.’s poetry!

***

Steeves May 22The DePaul Humanities Center would like to invite you to its next on campus event. H. Peter Steeves will be presenting “The About Time Show” on Wednesday, May 22nd, at 7:00 p.m. at the DePaul Student Center, room 120.

From the flyer: “The About Time Show is an interdisciplinary, multimedia investigation of temporality and the physics and metaphysics of time. We are all in the midst of time, at its mercy, held “green and dying,” hoping at best to sing in our chains like the sea. Yet what is time? It does not seem to be something in itself that we can experience, though it is necessary for there to be experience at all. We do not experience time, but rather we experience events taking place in time.

However, if time can be warped and bent—as must be the case if space and time are essentially the same thing—then time must be some thing in itself. By taking up a philosophic analysis of the scientifi c and ontological issues in a way that engages the arts (especially literature, music, dance, and theatre) and the humanities, The About Time Show proposes to make clearer how we exist outside of eternity, caught up in a realm of Becoming rather than Being, investigating together what it means to be in time and even, perhaps, discovering how to travel backwards in it.”

This event is free and open to the public.

***

Soft Skull Press, an imprint of Counterpoint press, is hiring! They are looking for a Publishing Assistant to join their team. This is an entry-level position based in Counterpoint’s Berkeley, CA offices. If you are interested, please send a cover letter & résumé to: pubasstjob@counterpointpress.com.

***

The Artifice, an online magazine that covers a wide spectrum of art forms (including Film, Anime, Comics, Literature, Arts, etc.), is actively looking for new writers. The website is collaboratively built and maintained by its writers. While writing for The Artifice does not pay, the platform has an established audience of millions.

The Artifice is currently expanding and would like to provide an opportunity for students to join their team of writers.

Any questions can be addressed to Alyson Burston at editor@the-artifice.com. To apply online, visit the-artifice.com/write.

***

Word Lab flier

826CHI’s upcoming summer ELL workshop, The Word Laboratory, is seeking volunteer tutors to work individually with 826CHI’s youngest learners (1st through 4th graders) as they practice all of the great skills they have gained this school year. Those interested would need to be available to volunteer a few hours a week between July 8th – August 1st, 2013. There are many volunteer slots yet to fill. No previous experience with ELL students or special language skills necessary – just a strong interest in working with kids in a creative/educational setting.

For more information, visit www.826chi.org. To apply, please contact Kendra Curry, Director of Volunteer Services, at Kendra@826chi.org.

Independent Publishers Gather for IBPA’s Publishing University: Guest Post by Alia Neaton

On April 27-28th, independent publishers, writers, and students gathered at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago for the Independent Book Publishers Association’s Publishing University 2013. Luckily for us, MAWP student Alia Neaton was in attendance all weekend, and has graciously taken the time to write up what she saw and what she learned about independent book publishing for today’s guest post. Alia says she found the conference “informative, inspiring, and helpful,” and would recommend it to anyone interested in attending next year. Thanks, Alia! 

“There are two kinds of authors,” Guy Kawasaki’s eyes leveled the crowd, “The kind who want a big advance and liars.”

Laughter filled the Monroe Room of Chicago’s Palmer hotel as the keynote speaker continued his lecture on self-publishing and his experience in the industry. Kawasaki, the former Apple evangelist and author of APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur—How to Publish a Book, opened the Independent Book Publishers Association’s Publishing University 2013 on Friday, April 27th. With the theme of “Discoverability: How to Reach Your Readers and Sell More Books,” the not-for-profit trade association developed a two-day conference filled with leaders in the independent publishing industry, covering topics ranging from “Secrets of Successful Amazon Selling” to “Strategies for a Winning Social Media Campaign.”

Attendees bustled from session to session, learning tips from the experts and exploring the vendor tables in the Adams Room, where printers, designers, and publishers displayed their services.

Saturday’s Keynote Luncheon featured Dominique Raccah, the founder of the largest woman-owned trader publishing company, Sourcebooks. She described her humble beginnings in 1987 with one book, which, in her words, “sucked!”

In 2012, Sourcebooks sales had bloomed into nearly 8 million books sold. Raccah’s lecture distilled her experience growing the company into the success it is today. She spoke about how publishers needed to consider the experience of their readers, “Discoverability is easier if people want to talk about your book.”

According to Raccah’s formula, there are four “Fundamentals of Making a Book Publisher”:

  1. Create a really strong book
  2. Communicate
  3. Distribute
  4. Rinse and Repeat

While it sounds simple, the groundbreaking work stems from the creative aspect. With the number-one problem in publishing being the disproportionately high failure rate of books, Raccah encouraged the audience to devote attention to the book itself, listing four components to creating a stronger book:

  1. Positioning
  2. Title
  3. Content & Internal Design
  4. Cover & Packaging.

The importance of the book’s cover, title and design had also been emphasized by Guy Kawasaki the day before. In a metaphor pitting publishing against the dating industry, Kawasaki described the consideration with which readers buy e-books as less like eHarmony and more like HotOrNot.com. Readers judge books by their cover.

Raccah’s lecture proved this phenomenon when she provided examples of books that had sold only 5,000 copies until a makeover of the cover and title boosted that number to 85,000. The recurring suggestion of multiple panelists was to always involve professionals and experts in the design, copy editing, and cover art of the book. From self-publishing on Wattpad or Smashwords to distributing through BookBaby or Vook, books can increase their possibility for exposure and reception by tapping into such experts.

“Quit narrowing your possibilities, “Raccah urged, “Create books that inspire you.” Her lecture closed with the insistence that she wanted her presentation to be from heart, “It’s about, in the end, touching people.”

For more information about the Independent Book Publishers Association, visit ibpa-online.org

For a copy of the full 2013 program, visit ibpapublishinguniversity.com/sessions-2013.

On How I Got Six Essays Published in MQR: Guest Post by Zhanna Vaynberg

Earlier this week, we received an exciting piece of Alumni News: after a long wait, MAWP graduate Zhanna Vaynberg‘s series of six short essays had finally gotten published in the Michigan Quarterly Review. We asked Zhanna how this unusual publishing contract had come about, and when she sat down to write out an answer, the story turned out to be quite long. We’re posting Zhanna’s story here as a guest post in hopes that it interests those of you looking to publish your writing in literary journals– and we would like to send Zhanna our thanks and congratulations!

On how I got six essays published in MQR’s winter 2013 issue:

Back in December of 2011, I e-mailed Michigan Quarterly Review asking if they’d had a chance to read over a short-short called “Roots” I’d sent them in the mail back in August (I was new to the whole submitting process, or I would’ve known that four months was basically one second in magazine-publishing time). Surprisingly, I got an e-mail the very next day from Jonathan Freedman, the head editor, saying that he’d just read it — I think it had gotten misplaced or they just had forgotten about it or something — and while he’d really enjoyed the essay, they just didn’t publish things that short (it was about a page long). He said, however, that he’d be happy to read something else I’d written. So I sent him two things — one of which was a short fiction piece that Bellevue Literary Review ended up publishing in fall, the other, a piece I’m still working on. His response was basically “I love your writing, but these aren’t stories that I want to publish.” Which I wasn’t offended about at all, because at that point both of them were quite old, and my writing had moved far past it. Then Jonathan presented me with a challenge. He said that the original story, ‘Roots,” which was basically about the ambivalence I’d felt towards my Ukrainian upbringing, had really stuck with him, and what if I wrote 5-6 more short pieces like it — in his words, something “world-weary in the best Russo-Jewish-American-Chicago way” — and he would publish them together?

We then went on to have a very long e-mail exchange that ranged in topics from our mutual hatred of Jerusalem (coincidentally, also a subject of one of the essays) to whatever happened to CBGB’s (it’s now an outlet store) to the best Thai food in Chicago (Thai Avenue on Broadway and Argyle). Then I didn’t really hear from him again until March or April of 2012. Meanwhile, I had just finished up the DePaul MAWP program, and after taking Michele Morano’s Travel Writing course was honestly a bit fed up with writing nonfiction and really didn’t want to do it again; and that is in no way to say I did not like Michele Morano or that class — I loved that class, and I think Michele Morano is one of the best professors out there (in fact, that I write nonfiction at all can be entirely traced back to a summer multi-genre course she taught, and four of the six essays in this bunch were originally written in classes she taught). It’s just that I don’t enjoy writing nonfiction all that much. I’ve always been a fiction person; even though much of it is intertwined with real experiences I’ve had or people I know, I like being able to play around with facts, and to hide behind that curtain of “it’s fiction!” anytime someone asks how much of a story I’d written was true. I wanted to get back to that.

However, it had been a few months already since we’d discussed the possibility of a collection of essays, and Jonathan asked me, in a very friendly way, if I had made any progress on our little project. I’d had some early drafts of two of the essays that would eventually end up in the issue, but I hadn’t really been working on it much. I’d also been published a few times by then, so I wasn’t in a big rush at this point. However, after a few weeks of relishing my post-grad-school freedom, I did slowly begin working on them again because I am an anxious person and don’t like to leave things unfinished. By July I had about half of them done and sent away to Jonathan. He wanted more — I wrote more. Then, just when I thought I had a good batch, five total, and would never have to write nonfiction again, he said “Yes, I’ll take them! But you have to write one more; something more current.” (All of the essays took place circa 2005 – 2010.) Luckily, it was nearly September, and my sister’s wedding was coming up — what better occasion to write about the authentic Russian-Jewish experience? So, even though it was very strange to write something I knew was for sure going to get published, and even though I’d drunk enough vodka to make an elephant pass out, I still managed to remember enough of the event to write a final essay about the experience. It wasn’t intended to tie together all the other essays in a neat bow or anything cheesy like that, but in a subtle way, there was a somewhat final tone to it. A little bit after that, I found a title to encompass all of them — as much as I could, away, considering each one is a separate entity to me. Then it was just a matter of waiting. First, it was supposed to go into the fall issue, but it didn’t fit — then, the winter issue, which was supposed to come out some months ago. Now, two days before May, the issue has finally been released! End of very long-winded story.

I’m actually very appreciative of the whole experience — it definitely helps to have deadlines and someone pushing you along so you don’t get too lazy, especially when you’re just out of school. Now that I’m used to being on my own, I have no problem writing on a pretty regular basis, but who knows if I’d still be at that point without having had that goal to work towards. And of course, the very patient Jonathan Freedman, who really gives magazine editors a good name.

You can order the Winter 2013 issue of Michigan Quarterly Review at michiganquarterlyreview.com/2013/04/winter-2013.

Gregory Martin on Campus, Publishing Career Panel, & A Job Posting

Martin VWThe Visiting Writers Program Welcomes author Gregory Martin to DePaul TOMORROW, Thursday, April 25th, at 6:00 p.m. in the Richardson Library room 115.

In his memoir Stories for Boys, Gregory Martin struggles to reconcile the father he thought he knew with a man who has just survived a suicide attempt; a man who had been having anonymous affairs with men throughout his thirty-nine years of marriage; and who now must begin his life as a gay man. At a tipping point in our national conversation about gender and sexuality, rights and acceptance, Stories for Boys is about a father and a son finding a way to build a new relationship with one another after years of suppression and denial are given air and light.

Martin’s memoir is quirky and compelling with its amateur photos and grab-bag social science and literary analyses. Gregory Martin explores the impact his father’s lifelong secrets have upon his life now as a husband and father of two young boys with humor and bracing candor. Stories for Boys is resonant with conflicting emotions and the complexities of family sympathy, and asks the questions: How well do we know the people that we think we know the best? And how much do we have to know in order to keep loving them?

“Stories for Boys is a magnetic meditation on what happens when a decades-long lie is brutally revealed. Moving, brave, and unforgettable, this deeply personal book pushes us all further into the light.”–Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild

Gregory Martin’s work has appeared in The Sun, The Kenyon Review Online, Creative Nonfiction, Storyquarterly, The Writer, Witness, and elsewhere. Stories for Boys (Hawthorne Books) was named a Discover Great New Writers selection by Barnes & Noble for Holiday 2012. Martin’s first book, Mountain City, received a Washington State Book Award, was named a New York Times Notable Book. He is an Associate Professor of English at the University of New Mexico and serves as Director of UNM’s Combined BA/MD Degree Program.  He lives in Albuquerque with his wife and two sons.

***

HowToBecomePublisher

The next English Department Career Panel is “How to Become a Publisher,” and it’s taking place on Monday, May 13th from 6:00-7:00 p.m. in Arts & Letters Hall room 109. Three Chicago publishers, Albert DeGenova, Wendy McClure, and Doug Siebold, will discuss their careers and their presses. Their presentations will be followed by a 30-minute Q&A.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to hear from these three great industry professionals right here on campus.

***

The literacy department at Open Books is looking for an intelligent, upbeat, and experienced education-aficionado to join their team as the nonprofit’s very first Teen Programs Manager.

Responsibilities include:

  • Overseeing the day-to-day operations of current teen programs
  • Assisting the literacy team in the development and implementation of new teen programs
  • Supervising a rotating group of talent, which may include a part-time Open Books Fellow and multiple Literacy Interns
  • Creating and executing ongoing strategies to recruit new school partners and scale program enrollment
  • Developing and maintaining effective relationships with schools, community groups, and other partners to further the Open Books mission

A complete list of responsibilities and requirements, as well as instructions on how to apply, is available at open-books.org/jobapps/jobapp-teenprogramsmgr.

Please apply as soon as possible and no later than May 15th, 2013.

Poetry Night, Love on the Road, and a Publishing Job

Design Cloud would like to invite the Depaul English department to join them on Thursday, February 21st for their first ever Poetry Night.

poetrynightPoetry Night will run from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Scheduled readings will fill the first hour and any and all interested poets are invited to read their work during an open mic portion during the second hour. Featured Readers include Matthew Corey, Susan Hogan, Paul Luikart, Jason Noah and Mylo Reyes.

There will be a $5 suggested donation.

Design Cloud describes themselves as, “an innovative space, a collective resource, a culture which allows our best work to be realized. At our core we are passionate creatives doing what we love. Our studio is also an art gallery fostering rising Chicago artists and curators. The intersection of art and design is our source of constant inspiration.”

Poetry Night is being held in conjunction with the Peculiar Poetics exhibition, February 1st – March 5th, 2013. Peculiar Poetics is an exhibition showcasing artists who reinvent the ordinary functions of objects into situations and moments of visual poetry, likewise poets use language to create visuals.  Poetry Night is an effort to show the importance of visual and verbal expression in both creative practices.

***

An new literary project called Love on the Road has issued a call for submissions. Love on the Road 2013 will be an anthology of stories about making LOTR2013connections, from heartfelt ones ending in weddings to less high-minded ones ending in beds (or wherever). Half the stories will be about travelers meeting people far from home, and the other half about people meeting travelers passing through.

Writers can submit their 5,000-word stories any time before March 31st, 2013. There is a $10 reading fee. Two editors will choose the best 12 stories for publication and send them to a panel of judges, which includes writers and literary agents. They will pick the stories that will win the cash prizes of $200, $100 and $50.

You find out more about this anthology and how to submit at loveontheroad2013.com.

***

And finally, a job opening: Chicago Review Press is seeking a Project Editor. This is a full-time position with benefits.

The project editor handles book production from approved manuscript to print for approximately 20 books a year. He or she coordinates with acquisition editors, authors, copy editors, proofreaders, indexers, and designers to shepherd books through the production process. The project editor is responsible for following schedules to meet publication dates and is directly supervised by the managing editor. He or she is expected to participate in meetings to evaluate proposals, titles, and covers. The ideal candidate has strong communication, organizational, and project/time management skills and is detail-oriented, fluent in Microsoft Word and Excel, and an experienced user of the Chicago Manual of Style. A minimum of one year of publishing experience is required. Interested candidates should forward a resume to Cynthia Sherry, Publisher, Chicago Review Press, 814 N. Franklin Street, Chicago, Illinois, 60610, e-mail csherry@chicagoreviewpress.com.